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Category Archives: Global Economy

For at least four thousand years (see the blog post by Tom DiLorenzo), political leaders in monarchies and democracies alike have instituted price ceilings.  The results have always been the same: chronic shortages.  Anyone who has read my posts here, especially my recent posts, have found me lamenting both the pharmaceutical shortages in the US […]

The shortages in Venezuela, as I have discussed in previous posts, are due to price ceilings which suppress the quantity offered on the market while encouraging extra consumption. Low prices also encourage exports of those price controlled items and discourage imports.  As a result, people in Venezuela are continuously frustrated in their basic attempts to buy […]

In my blog posts here, I usually provide links to news articles concerning the topic at hand.  Not this time.  Instead, I will just suggest that reader search news.google.com for water shortages.  What should be noted is that there is no shortage of news articles on water shortages.  Articles on climate change and business location […]

It looks like the grocery and basic goods shortage hitting Venezuela has gone to the next obvious step, rationing cards and blaming the rich for hoarding–and arbitrage with Colombia.  A regular reader of this blog will note that I have pointed out the troubles in Venezuela and their price controls on many other occasions.  for […]

Frank Bernanke’s term as Federal Reserve Chairman is about to draw to a close.  A Bush appointee, he has followed an aggressive expansion of bank reserves and the money supply, a policy that has the potential of leading to a substantial inflationary period.   Bernanke not only increased bank reserves through Open Market Operations, buying […]

Before Alan Greenspan’s almost 19-year reign as Federal Reserve Chairman (economic sith?), and before his appointment by Nixon as Chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors, Greenspan was a private sector economic consultant and a critic of fiat money or a government manipulated monetary system.  In fact, he penned ”Gold and Economic Freedom” (a short […]

One contender for this year’s Nobel Prize in Economics is Stanford economist Paul Romer, son of a Colorado governor. You should note that Romer is the developer of “Aplia,” a homework, quizzing, and practice software system that he sold a few years ago to Cengage. Aplia is the homework and quizzing software that is currently […]

Once you buy something, is it really yours?  If it were yours, wouldn’t you be able to resell it if you wanted to?  These are questions at the heart of a new case before the U.S. Supreme Court that you can read about here.  The case involves something that many college students should be able […]

If you take a look at this recent article from France24.com, you will see that many French businessmen are puting their houses on the market to leave France, trying to avoid being hit with a stinging 75% marginal tax rate (the rate on their highest earnings, their “marginal” earnings).  Leaving a high tax region was […]

  Disposable diapers have almost completely replaced cloth nappies in the U.S. and in many other developed nations.  There seems to be a high likelihood of a price increase in these convenient diapers after a recent explosion in Himeji, Japan, shut down a Nippon Shokubai chemical plant as we see in this article from ABC.  […]

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