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Documentation Resources

NOTE: This page provides Nicholls students and faculty with links to APAMLAChicago (Turabian),ASA, and Blue Book citation styles. If an answer to a particular documentation question cannot be located here, consult the complete entry provided in the print manuals available at the Reference Desk.

Other Documentation Clearinghouses

Duke University Libraries Citing Sources
includes documentation guidelines for citing sources and avoiding plagiarism.
Michigan State University Libraries Citation Guides and Generators
is an interactive listing of various documentation formats.
Necessities in Academics: An Educational Guide to Citation Styles
The ERIC Assessment and Evaluation Clearinghouse provides a significant list of citation resources.

Free Documentation Software *

Citation Machine
is an interactive Web tool designed to assist teachers in modeling the proper use of information property. Students are welcome to use this as well, by merely clicking the type of resource they wish to cite, completing the Web form that appears with the bibliographic information from the resource, and click Make Citations to generate standard MLA and APA citations.

APA Style

APA Online
excerpts from the 5th edition of the Publication Manual (© 2001), covering commonly asked questions regarding how to cite electronic media.
Lesley University’s APA Citation Format
is updated for the 5th Edition, and includes information on basic APA Format for Citing Print Materials, videos, online resources, ERIC documents and artistic productions.
Long Island University: B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library
gives color-coded for ease of use APA-formatted examples.
APA Style Essentials: Vanguard University
provides a common core of elements of APA style that all members of a department can adopt as minimal standards for any assignment that specifies APA style.
Duke University Libraries
gives tips for assembling a List of Works Cited in your paper.

MLA Style

Long Island University: B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library
gives color-coded for ease of use Chicago-formatted examples.
Writing Center: U. of Wisconsin-Madison

provides a writer’s handbook for citing sources in a paper.
The Community College of Southern Nevada’s MLA StyleSheet
is intended to help students easily format bibliographic citations for a “works cited” page to accompany research papers and other academic research projects. The examples highlight the most common sources used by students at the undergraduate level.
Duke University Libraries
gives tips for assembling a List of Works Cited in your paper.
LEO’s (Literacy Education Online )
provides a discussion of MLA formatting, with examples.

Chicago (Turabian) Style

Writing Center: U. of Wisconsin-Madison
hosts this writer’s handbook of Chicago (Turabian) style.
Duke University Libraries
gives tips for assembling a List of Works Cited in your paper, including examples of Chicago style formatting for books, articles, etc.
Long Island University: B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library
gives color-coded for ease of use Chicago-formatted examples.
Writing Center: U. of Wisconsin-Madison
tells how to create a Chicago/Turabian Works Cited page.

AMA Style

The University of New England
libraries have posted this PDF file that gives examples of the most often used types of sources.
The University of Washington’s Health – print sources
This is a guide to the most frequently used reference types, based on the AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors, 10th ed, c2007.
The University of Washington’s Health – electronic sources
This is a guide to the most frequently used reference types, based on the AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors, 10th ed, c2007.
The B. David Schwatrz Memorial Library
at Long Island University offers this color coded list of examples of the more common citations.
Based on American Medical Association Manual of Style
10th ed., 2007, this is a guide to the most frequently used entries.

ASCE Style

The American Society for Civil Engineers
publishes high quality, authoritative books that represent the best thinking in civil engineering research and practice. Included in that list are Standards, Manuals of Practice, Committee Reports, Proceedings, and ASCE Press titles. They also supply this quick Guide to Common Types of Referenced Material website, which will help guide writers who cite factual material that must be accompanied by a reference to its source. The ASCE citation standards require the authordate system of referencing and have two parts, the text citation and the reference (works cited) list.

 

ASA Style

Cal State’s University Library
publishes this guide for authors who are preparing manuscripts for publication in ASA journals, as well as a handout for students who are instructed to use “ASA style” when writing research papers.
Preparation Checklist for ASA Manuscripts
is provided by Professor James Beardon of Geneseo State University in New York.
Preparation Checklist for Sociology Papers
is intended to help you prepare your manuscript ASA format. It covers some details of presentation and style. This list has been edited from the American Sociological Association Style Guide (2d ed.).

CBE (Council of Biology Editors) Style

Ohio State University
provides this guide based on Scientific Style and Format: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers, 6th edition (1994). Citation examples are provided in Name-Year format. Bibliography items (to be listed alphabetically at the end of the research paper) are also provided. If none of these examples seem appropriate, consult the CBE Manual available in Ellender Library Ready Reference, behind the Reference Desk.
MCC Libraries of Monroe Community College (New York)
lists hyperlinked examples of the two systems of CBE documentation: the name-year (N-Y) based, and the citation-sequence (C-S) system that uses numerical listing of sources in the sequence they are mentioned in the paper. Sample papers in both systems follow the examples.
Bedford St. Martin’s Online Guide
offers a sample chapter which gives guidelines for citing print materials and Internet sources, based on the principles presented in the sixth edition of Scientific Style and Format: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers.

Blue Book

Cornell University’s Legal Information Institute
provides information from the Introduction to Basic Legal Citation (LII 2003 ed.), by Peter W. Martin, which first appeared in 1993 but was revised on July 11, 2003 to include coverage of executive orders and proclamations.

* NOTE: This page provides Nicholls students and faculty with links to APA, MLA, Chicago (Turabian), ASA, and Blue Book citation styles. If an answer to a particular documentation question cannot be located here, consult the complete entry provided in the print manuals available at the Reference Desk.

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