DEGREES AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


GRADUATION UNDER A SPECIFIC BULLETIN

University policy allows a student seven years to graduate under the Catalog in effect at the time of initial enrollment at Nicholls, even though the student has made a change in curriculum or has had a break in college attendance. Time limitations for graduate degrees appear in the section of the Catalog devoted to GRADUATE STUDIES.

Within the seven year period, students may change to another Catalog in the office of their departments. Students unable to complete a degree program within seven years after entering the university are expected to follow the Catalog in effect during their eighth year of attendance (or the Catalog in effect the year of graduation).

Students who are pursuing more than one degree simultaneously or who wish to earn an additional degree (see Second Undergraduate Degree) after completing the first may follow the same Catalog if no more than seven years have elapsed and there has not been a break from the university of more than one semester.

CHANGE OF CURRICULUM

Change of curriculum becomes official on the date of submission to the Office of Records and Registration. Students should be advised by faculty in the newly chosen curriculum for the next semester. Records, however, will be formally transferred at the beginning of the following semester.

When programs must meet curricular requirements set by external agencies, such as accrediting associations, curricular changes may be made without prior notice, and students may be required to conform to such changes when they become effective.

DEGREES AWARDED

Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Fine Arts

  • Art
    • K-12 Art Education Concentration

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies

Bachelor of Science

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Associate of General Studies

Associate of Science

MINORS AVAILABLE (COLLEGE NOTED)

  • Accounting (Business Administration)
  • Addictive Behaviors (Education)
  • Art History (Arts and Sciences)
  • Art Studio (Arts and Sciences)
  • Bayou Studies (Arts and Sciences)
  • Biology (Arts and Sciences)
  • Business Administration (Business Administration)
  • Chemistry (Arts and Sciences)
  • Computer Science (Arts & Sciences)
  • Creative Writing (Arts and Sciences)
  • Culinary Arts (Nursing and Allied Health)
  • Economics (Business Administration)
  • English (Arts and Sciences)
  • Family and Consumer Sciences (Education)
  • Film Studies (Arts and Sciences)
  • Finance (Business Administration)
  • Food Service Strategies and Operations (Nursing and Allied Health)
  • French (Arts and Sciences)
  • Geography (Arts and Sciences)
  • Government (Arts and Sciences)
  • Health Promotion (Nursing and Allied Health)
  • History (Arts and Sciences)
  • Humanities (Arts and Sciences)
  • Information Systems (Business Administration)
  • International Studies (Arts and Sciences)
  • Internet Studies and Web Development (Arts and Sciences)
  • Management (Business Administration)
  • Marketing (Business Administration)
  • Mass Communication (Arts and Sciences)
  • Mathematics (Arts and Sciences)
  • Music (Arts and Sciences)
  • Psychology (Education)
  • Social Sciences (Arts and Sciences)
  • Sociology (Arts and Sciences)
  • Spanish (Arts and Sciences)
  • Speech (Arts and Sciences)
  • Theatre (Arts and Sciences)

GRADUATE DEGREES

The university awards the following graduate degrees. For more information please visit Graduate Studies:

Executive Master of Business Administration

Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Master of Arts in Teaching

  • Elementary School Education
  • Middle School Education
  • Secondary School Education
  • Human Performance Education K-12

Master of Business Administration

Master of Education

  • Educational Leadership
    • Higher Education Administration Concentration
    • K-12 School Leadership Concentration
    • Educational Technology Leadership Concentration
  • Curriculum and Instruction
    • Early Childhood Concentration
    • Elementary Education Concentration
    • High Incidence Disabilities Concentration
    • Reading Specialist Concentration
    • Secondary Education Concentration
  • School Counseling

Master of Science in Community/Technical College Mathematics

Master of Science in Marine and Environmental Biology

Master of Science in Nursing

  • Family Nurse Practitioner Concentration
  • Psychiatric/Mental health Nurse Practitioner Concentration
  • Nurse Executive Concentration
  • Nursing Education Concentration

Specialist in School Psychology

[Back] [Top]

Degree with Honors

The baccalaureate degree is awarded summa cum laude to any student whose official cumulative (external) grade point average is at least 3.900; magna cum laude if the official cumulative (external) grade point average is 3.700 3.899; and cum laude if the official cumulative (external) grade point average is 3.500 3.699. To be eligible for degrees awarded with honors, candidates must have earned at Nicholls more than 50 percent of the total college credits applied to the degree.

Note: Effective summer 1997 the official cumulative grade point average for academic honors and class standing is calculated using all hours attempted and total quality points earned (external grade-point average).

Developmental courses which are taken during or after summer 1998 will not be included in the determination of GPA for honors.

Graduate students who earn an overall average of 4.000 on all courses pursued toward the degree awarded are recognized for this achievement during Commencement exercises.

Only students receiving a baccalaureate or a graduate degree are eligible to receive honors.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

To qualify for graduation from Nicholls State University with a baccalaureate or associate degree the student must meet general education requirements, general university requirements and residence requirements as specified.

General Education Requirements  (GER)

In support of the university’s mission to create a personalized, culturally rich, and dynamic learning environment, the General Education Program at Nicholls State University provides a common integrative learning experience for all undergraduates, regardless of their major or their program of study.   This common core of study develops and fosters:

  • foundational competencies in communication, critical thinking, computer and information literacy, and quantitative reasoning
  • an understanding of the natural and social worlds in which we live
  • an awareness of the importance of the past and a familiarity with the cultural movements that have shaped the present
  • an informed appreciation for the artistic and philosophical expressions of the human community
  • the exercise of moral reasoning, ethical choices, and social responsibility
  • intellectual curiosity, independent and life-long learning
  • knowledgeable and tolerant perspectives of intercultural and international issues and challenges

The general education core curriculum must be completed by each student working toward a baccalaureate or associate degree at Nicholls. Students take a general education competency test before graduation. Test results are used solely for program evaluation, and student cooperation is required. For more information, see the NSU General Education website at www.nicholls.edu/general_education.

Departments specify which general education courses are required for each particular major, minor, concentration and/or certification.

General Education Course Criteria

  1. If prerequisite courses are required, they should be another General Education course.
  2. The courses do not narrowly focus on those skills, techniques, and procedures specific to a particular occupation or profession.
  3. Courses must cover General Learning objectives for the relevant General Education area.
  4. General education courses should provide an introduction to a discipline, as in a survey course that covers a wide range of material within a specific discipline or area of inquiry and acquaints students with a broad section of the information or skills available in that area, or an appreciation course that introduces students to a creative field and leads to a general understanding and appreciation of work by others.
  5. Courses that are “repeatable for credit” will not be accepted in the General Education Core Curriculum unless approved through GEAC.

General Education Core Curriculum

  1. Core Proficiencies
    Baccalaureate Associate
    Effective Communication: Writing (English Composition) 9 hours 6 hours
    ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. Each student shall fulfill English competency requirements by earning a C or better in 102. (3 hrs.) (3 hrs.)
    ENGL 102 or ENGL 112.  Each student shall fulfill English competency requirements by earning a C or better in 102. (3 hrs.) (3 hrs.)
    Writing-Intensive Course: From ENGL 310, 366, 368, 468, BSAD 310, MACO 251 as specified by the major/minor/concentration/certification. These courses teach effective writing within a discipline with primary emphasis on the further development of essential writing and reasoning skills necessary for success in students’ academic, personal, and professional lives. (3 hrs.)
    Quantitative Reasoning: Mathematics (e.g., Mathematics, Statistics, Symbolic Logic) 6 hours 6 hours
    MATH 101. College Algebra.
    MATH 102. Trigonometry.
    MATH 106. Calculus with Business and Economic Applications.
    MATH 108. Pre-Calculus.
    MATH 113. Honors Pre-Calculus.
    MATH 114. Honors Trigonometry.
    MATH 117. Contemporary Mathematics and Quantitative Analysis.
    MATH 214. Introductory Statistics.
  2. Breadth of Knowledge Areas
    Fine Arts (e.g., Music, Visual Arts, Applied Arts, Theatre, Dance, Interdisciplinary) 3 hours 3 hours*
    ART 110. Art Appreciation.
    ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
    ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
    ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
    ART 201. Beginning Drawing.
    ART 211. Beginning Painting.
    ART 221. Beginning Printmaking.
    ART 231. Beginning Ceramics.
    ART 240. Sculptural and Three-Dimensional Design.
    ART 261. Beginning Photography.
    ART 280. Art History: Ancient Art.
    ART 281. Art History: Non-Western Art.
    ART 282. Art History: Italian Renaissance Art.
    ART 383. Art History: Modern Art.
    ART 384. History of Photography.
    ART 386. History of American Art.
    FNAR 105. Arts in Education.
    FNAR 301. Fine Arts Survey I.
    FNAR 302. Fine Arts Survey II.
    FNAR 303. Topics in Fine Arts.
    MUS 101. Basic Piano.
    MUS 102. Basic Piano.
    MUS 104. Basic Voice.
    MUS 105. General Music Appreciation.
    MUS 107. Honors Music Appreciation.
    MUS 319. Jazz History.
    MUS 320. History of Rock and Roll.
    MUS 407. World Music.
    Humanities (e.g., Literature, Foreign Languages, History, Classical Studies, Communications, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Interdisciplinary) 9 hours 3 hours*
    3 hours from the following 100 or 200 level HIST
    HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
    HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
    HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
    HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
    HIST 150. World History.
    HIST 151. World History.
    HIST 160. Honors World History I.
    HIST 161. Honors World History II.
    HIST 201. History of Women.
    HIST 255. American History.
    HIST 256. American History.
    (3 hours)
    3 hours from the following Literature courses
    ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
    ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
    ENGL 215.  Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature.
    ENGL 216.  Appreciation of Literary Genres.
    ENGL 217. Survey of Literary and Media Studies.
    ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
    ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
    ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
    ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
    ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
    ENGL 332. Drama.
    ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
    FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
    SPAN 351. Introduction to Spanish Literature.
    SPAN 355. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature.
    ( 3 hours)
    3 hours from the following Humanities courses
    ART 110. Art Appreciation.
    ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
    ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
    ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
    ART 280. Art History Survey I.
    ART 281. Art History Survey II.
    ART 282. Art History Survey III.
    ART 383. Art History Survey IV.
    ART 384. History of Photography.
    ART 386.  History of American Art.
    ART 392. Readings in Art History.
    ART 393. Honors Readings in Art History.
    CULA 101. Culinary History and Development.
    ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
    ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
    ENGL 240. Introduction to Film.
    ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
    ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
    ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
    ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
    ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
    ENGL 326. Introduction to Folklore.
    ENGL 332. Drama.
    ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
    FREN 101. Elementary French I.
    FREN 102. Elementary French II.
    FREN 309. Children’s Literature.
    FREN 310. Francophone Culture and Civilization.
    FREN 315. Survey of French Literature.
    FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
    FREN 324. Advanced French Language Skills Through Immersion.
    FREN 330. Advanced French Conversation.
    FREN 350. Introduction to Commercial French.
    GOVT 355. Political Theory.
    HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
    HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
    HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
    HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
    HIST 150. World History.
    HIST 151. World History.
    HIST 160. Honors World History I.
    HIST 161. Honors World History II.
    HIST 201. History of Women.
    HIST 255. American History.
    HIST 256. American History.
    HIST 307. Modern East Asia
    HIST 311. African American History
    HIST 319. History of Women in America
    HIST 350. History of Latin America.
    HIST 371. History of Louisiana
    HUMA 111. The Honors Forum.
    HUMA 204. International Humanities.
    HUMA 260. European Humanities.
    HUMA 303.  French and Francophone Literature in Translation.
    HUMA 350. Classical Mythology.
    HUMA 351. The Culture of Greece and Rome.
    MACO 101. Survey of Mass Communication.
    MACO 355. History and Principles of Mass Communication.
    MUS 105. General Music Appreciation.
    MUS 107. Honors Music Appreciation.
    MUS 240. Survey of Music Literature.
    MUS 319. Jazz History.
    MUS 320. History of Rock and Roll.
    MUS 340. Music History: c. 400 to 1750.
    MUS 341. Music History: 1750 to present.
    MUS 407. World Music.
    PHIL 203. General Introduction to Philosophy.
    SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I.
    SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish II.
    SPAN 351. Introduction to Spanish Literature.
    SPAN 355. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature.
    SPCH 201. Interpersonal Communication.
    SPCH 300. Theater and Film Appreciation.
    SPCH 302. Persuasive Communication.
    (3 hours)
    Natural Sciences Life Science: (e.g., Biology, Biochemistry, Botany, Zoology) and  Physical Science: (e.g., Chemistry, Geology, Physics, Astronomy/Meteorology)Six hours shall be earned in a single life or physical science, and three hours must be earned in a natural science area other than that selected to fulfill the six-hour requirement, as specified by the major/minor/concentration/certification. 9 hours 6 hours of any science. No sequence required.
    Life Science
    BIOL 105. Basic Biology I – Principles of Biology.
    BIOL 106. Basic Biology II – The Diversity of Life.
    BIOL 114. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
    BIOL 116. Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
    BIOL 124. Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
    BIOL 126. Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
    BIOL 155. General Biology I.
    BIOL 156. General Biology II.
    BIOL 206. Tropical Biology I: Pacific slope.
    BIOL 207. Tropical Biology II: Caribbean slope.
    BIOL 215. Pirogue Biology
    Physical Science
    ASTR 101. Astronomy of the Solar System.
    ASTR 102. Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies.
    CHEM 101. General Chemistry I.
    CHEM 102. General Chemistry II.
    CHEM 105. Introductory Chemistry I.
    CHEM 106. Introductory Chemistry II.
    CHEM 109. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry for Nursing.
    CHEM 208. Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Health Sciences.
    GEOL 101. Physical Geology.
    GEOL 102. Historical Geology.
    GEOL 300. Oceanography.
    GEOL 370. Environmental Geology
    PHSC 101. Introductory Physical Science I.
    PHSC 102. Introductory Physical Science II.
    PHSC 103. Introductory Physical Science III.
    PHYS 101. Basic Physics.
    PHYS 102. Basic Physics.
    PHYS 151. Physics for Allied Health.
    PHYS 201. General Physics.
    PHYS 202. General Physics.
    Social and Behavioral Sciences Social ScienceSocial Science: ( e.g., Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography, International Studies, Interdisciplinary, Political Science) and Behavioral Science: (e.g., Psychology, Sociology) 6 hours 3 hours for A.S.6 hours for A.G.S.
    CRJU 101. Introduction to Criminal Justice.
    CRJU 201. Applied Criminology.
    CRJU 202. Public and Community Relations.
    CRJU 203. Criminal Related Law.
    CRJU 204. Police Administration.
    CRJU 220. Adjudication Process.
    CRJU 305. Introduction to Corrections.
    ECON 211. Principles of Microeconomics.
    ECON 212. Principles of Macroeconomics.
    ECON 255. Survey of Economic Principles.
    ECON 322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    GEOG 103. Physical Geography.
    GEOG 104. World Regional Geography.
    GOVT 101. American National Government.
    GOVT 250. Contemporary Political Ideologies.
    GOVT 252. State and Local Government.
    GOVT 351. American Political Thought.
    GOVT 355. Political Theory.
    GOVT 391. International Relations and Politics.
    GOVT 399. Civil Liberties.
    SOCI 151. Introductory Sociology
    SOCI 155. Honors Introductory Sociology
    SOCI 201. Social Problems
    SOCI 204. Cultural Diversity in American Society
    SOCI 205. Social Research I
    SOCI 300. Social Service Institutions
    SOCI 302:  Sociology of Aging
    SOCI 303. Religion — A Social Force
    SOCI 304. Community Development
    SOCI 306. Case Management
    SOCI 324. Social Stratification
    SOCI 325. Medical Sociology
    SOCI 333. Sociology of Social Work
    SOCI 360. Population Demographics and Dynamics
    SOCI 380. Social Movements and Collective Behavior
    SOCI 385. Criminology
    SOCI 386. Sociology of Deviant Behavior
    SOCI 387. Sociology of Drug Abuse
    SOCI 390. Interpersonal Violence
    SOCI 391. Families and Lifestyles
    SOCI 395. Racial and Cultural Minorities
    PSYC 101. General Psychology.
    PSYC 206. Child Psychology.
    PSYC 210. Adolescent and Adult Development.
    PSYC 212. Life Span Developmental Psychology.
    PSYC 311. Educational Psychology.
    Total General Education Requirements 42 hours 27-30 hours

*At most, 3 of the 6 hours can be selected from the following skills courses.  ART 201. Beginning Drawing, ART 211.  Beginning Painting, ART 221. Beginning Printmaking, ART 231. Beginning Ceramics, ART 240. Sculptural and Three-Dimensional Design, ART 261. Beginning Photography, MUS 101. Basic Piano, MUS 102. Basic Piano, MUS 104. Basic Voice, FREN 101. Elementary French I, FREN 102.  Elementary French II, SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I, SPAN 102 Spanish II.

University Requirement (UR)

One freshman seminar course from the following approved list: UNIV 101 or PSET 100.

Computer Literacy Requirement (CLR) – 2 hours

Computer literacy competency requirements are specified by each department from the list of approved courses. Approved computer literacy courses: CMPS 107, 108, 109, 130, 200, 207, 208, 209; EDUC 251; MNTC 110; MACO 321, 322, 362; MUS 201; OIS 200. See program description for specific requirement by major.

Oral Communication Requirement (OCR) – 3 hours

Oral communication competency requirements are specified by each department from the list of approved courses.
Approved oral communication courses: ART 251; ENGL 304; EDUC 456, 457, 458, 461, 465, 483; FCED 262, 239; collective completion of  NURS 340, 371, and 422; SPCH 101, 104, or 105; SPCH 363; collective completion of MUS 211, 212, 272, 340, and 341; collective completion of MUED 223, 225, 227, 383, 385, and MUS 272, 302 and 341; collective completion of MUED 383, 384, 478 and MUS 272, 303, and 341. See program description for specific requirement by major.

[Back] [Top]

Baccalaureate Degree

General Requirements for Baccalaureate Degree

In addition to the General Education (GER), University (UR), Computer Literacy (CLR) and Oral Communication (OCR) requirements, to qualify for graduation with a baccalaureate degree, a student must:

  • Complete all work in one of the curricula as outlined in the university Bulletin including the university General Education requirements and an approved freshman seminar course.
  • Achieve competencies in computer literacy and oral communication as determined by individual departments or curricula.
  • Successfully complete at least 24 semester hours in the subject of the major or field of concentration. Some curricula require more hours and no grade lower than C in the major field.
  • Earn an overall adjusted (internal) grade point average of at least 2.0 in all work and in the minor subject, if any. A minor consists of a minimum of 18 semester hours in the minor field of concentration if a minor is stipulated by the department. A transfer student, in addition to meeting the above requirements, must have an adjusted (internal) grade point average of at least 2.0 in courses taken at Nicholls and which lead to a degree
  • Earn a minimum of 120 semester hours in degree courses.
  • Earn at least 45 semester hours in courses numbered 300 or above.
  • Fulfill the residence requirements. (See Residence Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree.)
  • Consult the academic dean of his or her college prior to the semester he or she intends to complete degree requirements and have academic records checked for completeness and accuracy.
  • Apply for the degree with the Office of Records and Registration during the registration period for the semester or summer session in which degree requirements are to be completed.
  • Pay graduation fees during the registration period for the semester or summer session in which degree requirements are to be completed.
  • Clear all university accounts.
  • Participate in Commencement exercises. Because of extenuating circumstances, a student may request permission to be awarded the degree in absentia. The request must be made in writing to the dean of the student’s college prior to graduation. A mailing fee of $10 is assessed for diplomas mailed within the continental United States and $25 outside the continental United States.
Residence Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree

To qualify for graduation with a baccalaureate degree, a student must:

  • Earn at least 25 percent of credit hours in residence at Nicholls and earn a majority of credits in the major at Nicholls.
  • Earn at Nicholls at least 24 of the last 30 semester hours offered in fulfillment of the degree requirements, six of which must be in the major field.
  • For certain pre professional majors, complete 3 years of curriculum in pre dentistry, pre medicine, pre physical therapy, pre veterinary medicine, or pre medical technology; subsequently complete with at least a 2.0 grade-point average the first year of work in an accredited professional school (see curriculum requirements); and transfer the first 30 semester hours of professional school credits to Nicholls. A student completing work for a degree in this manner must earn at Nicholls at least 24 semester hours in residence after the sophomore year, and must fulfill general university degree requirements.
  • Earn at least 50 percent of degree requirements at Nicholls or in residence at another accredited university or college. The remaining 50 percent of these requirements may be gained through correspondence, extension, military service, military service schools, CLEP, or any accumulation from all categories of testing, placements, and similar programs.
  • Be enrolled during the last semester in residence at Nicholls in the college from which the degree is sought.

Additional Undergraduate Degree

A student wishing to earn an additional baccalaureate degree in another field of study at the university must earn at least 30 semester hours in addition to the number required for the first degree and must also satisfy all requirements for each degree. The additional 30 hours need not have been completed after the first degree was awarded, but the total hours earned must be the number required for the first and 30 more hours.

To receive an associate degree as an additional degree, the student must meet the requirements of the degree and earn no less than 15 semester hours at Nicholls in addition to the hours required for the first degree.

More Than One Major

Students are permitted to pursue two or more majors simultaneously by petitioning the dean or deans of the appropriate curricula. Identifications of the majors are posted on the transcript only as a part of the degree. A second or additional major will not be indicated if requirements are completed subsequent to graduation.

Associate Degree

General Requirements for Associate Degree

In addition to the General Education (GER), University (UR), Computer Literacy (CLR) and Oral Communication (OCR) requirements, to qualify for graduation with an associate degree, a student must:

  • Complete all work in one of the curricula as outlined in the university Catalog including the university General Education requirements and an approved freshman seminar course.
  • Achieve competencies in computer literacy and oral communication as determined by individual departments or curricula.
  • Complete a minimum of 60 semester hours in degree credit courses.
  • Fulfill the residence requirements. (See Residence Requirements for  Associate Degree.)
  • Have an overall adjusted (internal) grade-point average of at least 2.0 in all courses.
  • Apply for the degree by the deadline as published in the university calendar with the Office of Records and Registration during the registration period for the semester or summer session in which degree requirements are to be completed, and pay graduation fees at that time.
  • Clear all university accounts.
  • Participate in commencement exercises. Because of extenuating circumstances, a student may request permission to be awarded the degree in absentia. The request must be made in writing to the dean of the student’s college prior to graduation. A mailing fee of $10 is assessed for diplomas mailed within the continental United States and $25 outside the continental United States.
Residence Requirements  for Associate Degree

To qualify for graduation with an associate degree, a student must:

  • Earn at least 25% of credit hours in residence at Nicholls.
  • Complete at least 12 of the last 15 semester hours in residence at Nicholls.
  • Be enrolled during the last semester in residence at Nicholls in a college from which the degree is sought.

Graduate Degree

Requirements for a graduate degree appear in the section of the Catalog devoted to GRADUATE STUDIES.

[Back] [Top]