Fall 2016: Creative Writing / Reading Series Dates

Plan on joining us at the Colonel’s Retreat in the Student Union.  Students (and faculty) are invited to read their original creative works in an informal, public forum.  The fall 2016 dates and topics are listed below – please plan on joining us – we look forward to seeing you there.  The microphone goes on at 6:00 p.m. sharp….see you there.

 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14:  OPEN MIC NIGHT

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4:  THEMED READING

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26:  BATTLE ROYALE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16:  SENIOR SHOWCASE

 

Fall 2015 English Literature Course Offerings

Fall 2015

ENGL 215: Going Home Again – Homecoming WWW, WW1
Instructor: Allen, Gabi Gautreaux
Catalog Description: ENGL 215; Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. The study of a specified theme as it recurs through literature. (23.0101).
Course Theme: Going Home Again: The Literature of Homecoming
Course Description: Through a selection of readings from poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, students will explore the emotionally fraught subject of returning home after significant absence, looking closely at how the journey transforms the traveller—and the place called “home.”
Textbook Requirements: Required reading, a combination of fiction and non-fiction, will include Joshilyn Jackson’s Gods in Alabama, William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, Rob Dreher’s The Little Way of Ruthie Leming, and selections from Homer’s Odyssey.
ENGL 215: Seven Deadly Sins 2M
Instructor: Stanga, Linda
Catalog Description: ENGL 215; Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. The study of a specified theme as it recurs through literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: The Seven Deadly Sins in Literature
Course Description: The Seven Deadly Sins left a profound mark on Western literature and art and continue to inspire. Students who take this course should be able to communicate intelligently about the history and development in Western thought of the notion of the seven deadly sins, drawing on evidence from literature and popular culture. They should also be able to follow and analyze complex arguments as well as construct their own arguments related to the course theme.
Textbook Requirements: The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler, Daniel Born et al., eds.; The Seven Deadly Sins Today, Henry Fairlie; The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
ENGL 215: Narratives: War, Peace, and PTSD 2T
Instructor: Schmidt Staley, Elka
Catalog Description: ENGL 215; Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. The study of a specified theme as it recurs through literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: Seeing Combat: Narratives of War, Peace, and PTSD (Post traumatic stress disorder)
Course Description: Narratives of “seeing combat” as presented in the short story, the memoir, the essay, or the novel and the effects of war, peace, and PTSD.
Textbook Requirements: Fives and Twenty-Fives – Michael Pitre. Redeployment – Phil Klay. Thank you for Your Service – David Finkel. Plenty of Time When We Get Home – Kayla Williams. With the Old Breed – E.B. Sledge. All the Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr.
ENGL 215: Gods – Goddesses – Visions 6T
Instructor: Udall, Jay
Catalog Description: ENGL 215; Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. The study of a specified theme as it recurs through literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: Using various literary genres, this course will explore religious/spiritual ideas and experiences.
Course Description: In this course we will explore images and ideas of the divine as expressed in poems, plays, short stories, novels, essays, and film from around the world and throughout history. Our focus will be on how the divine or sacred is experienced, defined, and redefined by different writers, and how these experiences and definitions both reflect and respond to the historical, social and cultural conditions from which they arise. We will also examine the ways in which spiritual ideas influence our notions of the body, sexuality, nature, art, education, and politics.
Textbook Requirements: Australian Aboriginal myths (short stories), The Enlightened Heart, Stephen Mitchell, Editor (anthology of spiritual poetry from around the world), Siddartha, Hermann Hesse, The Bacchae, Euripides, C.K. Williams, Translator (drama), The Night of the Iguana, Tennessee Williams (drama), Bless Me, Ultima, Rudolfo Anaya (novel), The Color Purple, Alice Walker, Between Godliness and Godlessness (essay), The Great Mother (essay), and various selected film scenes.
ENGL 215: World War II – War Stories
7M
Instructor: Pejic, April
Catalog Description: ENGL 215; Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. The study of a specified theme as it recurs through literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: World War II Literature
Course Description: The devastation of World War II shaped the political climate and geography of the world we know today, and it also inspired some fantastic literature. In this course, we will examine works from many different perspectives: a Japanese girl dealing with the nuclear fallout of an atomic bomb, an American soldier witnessing the bombing of Dresden, a German radio operator occupying France, a member of the Norwegian Underground fleeing capture on the fjords, and a Polish concentration camp survivor struggling with guilt. We will explore not only the way that war shapes the political identities of countries, but also the personal identities of soldiers and civilians alike.
Textbook Requirements: Black Rain by Ibuse Masuji, Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, Maus by Art Speigelman, We Die Alone by David Howarth, and A Woman In Berlin by Anonymous
ENGL 216: Women’s Travel Literature WWW
Instructor: Tuman, Myron
Catalog Description: ENGL 216; Appreciation of Literary Genres; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A general introduction to the study and appreciation of genres and subgenres of literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: Women’s Travel Literature

Course Description: A look at the writings–mostly memoirs, letters, and essays–by noted women authors and some fearless women, recounting their travels to unusual places in search both for new adventures and, just as often, a deeper sense of themselves.
Textbook Requirements:

Elizabeth Gilbert’s bestseller Eat, Pray, Love; Elizabeth Von Arnim’s Enchanted April; along with a series of web readings, including memoirs by Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter, Mary Shelley. We will also view a number of feature films, including The Enchanted April (1992), Under the Tuscan Sun (2003), and Summertime – (1954)
ENGL 216: Survey of Southern Noir 3T
Instructor: Schmidt Staley, Elka
Catalog Description: ENGL 216: Appreciation of Literary Genres; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A general introduction to the study and appreciation of genres and subgenres of literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: Grit Lit: Survey of Southern Noir. (Short Story and Novel).
Course Description: Growing out of Southern Gothic and Grotesque and Flannery O’Conner, this contemporary genre explores the “Rough South,” and the lives, and especially the crimes, of “rednecks” and other characters–broke, divorced, violent–not good country people. Some are the sensitive types, struggling to be “the one who got away.” Fans of crime fiction, film noir, mysteries, and thrillers will find a lot to like in these shorts stories and novels, as well as fans of Flannery O’Conner, Eudora Welty, and Carson McCullers.
Textbook Requirements: Grit Lit: A Rough Southern Reader(ed. Carpenter), Bastard Out of Carolina (Allison), The Missing (Gautreaux), Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter (Franklin)
ENGL 216: The Picaresque Novel 4M
Instructor: Illidge, Mabelle
Catalog Description: ENGL 216; Appreciation of Literary Genres; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A general introduction to the study and appreciation of genres and subgenres of literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: This course will provide a glimpse into the 16th and 17th centuries landscape as depicted by some of the great writers of the Golden Age of Spanish literature.
Course Description: This course comprises the end of the Renaissance and the Spanish Baroque periods. Through the study of the Picaresque Novel, thus named after its main character el pícaro (rogue or rascal), students will have a greater appreciation of this period, through investigation and evaluation of its aesthetic, historical, philosophical, and literary dimensions. Although the works will be read in translation, the student will develop an appreciation for the excellent prose of the writers to be studied.
Textbook Requirements: The students will read El Lazarillo de Tormes (unknown author) 1554; El Buscón (The Swindler) by Francisco de Quevedo 1604-1620; and Guzmán de Alfarache by Mateo Alemán 1599-1604. In addition, there will be short readings by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Rinconete y Cortadillo from Novelas Ejemplares or Exemplary Novels; and excerpts from El Periquilo Sarniento by Fernández de Lizardi, México, 1816.
ENGL 216: Introduction to Irish Literature
5M
Instructor: White, Robin
Catalog Description: ENGL 216; Appreciation of Literary Genres; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A general introduction to the study and appreciation of genres and subgenres of literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme:
Course Description:
Textbook Requirements:
ENGL 216: Survey of Japanese Literature 7M
Instructor: Portier, Jenna
Catalog Description: ENGL 216; Appreciation of Literary Genres; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A general introduction to the study and appreciation of genres and subgenres of literature. (23.0101)
Course Theme: A broad survey of the different types of literature from Japan
Course Description: For this course, we will cover the following genres: Japanese folklore, short stories based on folklore, the poetry form native of Japan, the haiku, the first novel ever, a manga, some film, and a few modern novels. This class is meant to be a broad overview of the literature of Japan by looking a selected works to see how the literature is directly affected by the culture and history of Japan. No prior experience with Japanese culture is needed since the main cultural influences of Japan, for example Zen Buddhism, will also be covered.
Textbook Requirements: The texts we will read for this class will probably include: haiku by Basho, the Noh play Atsumori, selected folktales from Japanese Tales by Royall Tyler, selected sections of The Tales of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu, selected articles from The Japanese Mind by Davies and Ikeno, A Robe of Feathers by Teresa Matsuda, After Dark by Haruki Murakami, The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa, a manga (possibly Battle Royale by Koushun Takami), and one more novel. The books were purposely picked to keep book costs down as much as possible. We will also watch the PBC documentary The Buddha and other cultural-related videos.
ENGL 217: Baseball, Literature, and Media
WWW
Instructor: Landry, Kelly
Catalog Description: ENGL 217; Survey of Literary and Media Studies; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A study of literature and its relationship to other forms of media. (23.0101)
Course Theme:
Course Description:
Textbook Requirements:
ENGL 217: Topics in Sports Literature
WW1
Instructor: Tuman, Myron
Catalog Description: ENGL 217; Survey of Literary and Media Studies; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A study of literature and its relationship to other forms of media. (23.0101)
Course Theme:
Course Description:
Textbook Requirements:
ENGL 217: Writers / Directors and The Art of Adaptation
3M
Instructor: Remark, Melissa
Catalog Description: ENGL 217; Survey of Literary and Media Studies; 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. A study of literature and its relationship to other forms of media. (23.0101)
Course Theme: A study in the art of adapting literature to script to screen.
Course Description: “Writers, Directors, and the Art of Adaptation” investigates the various techniques and devices writers and directors use to create meaning in story. In this course, students will fine-tune their analytical skills studying narrative structure, characterization, dialogue, and scene in literature, and then examine the choices made by screenwriters and directors to shape story into film. We’ll read selected novels, short stories, and scripts, and also watch and discuss the resulting films. We’ll debate whether the screenwriters and directors have maintained the integrity of the original work and argue which version of the story has the most impact and why. Basic knowledge of filmmaking terms will be an asset in this course.
Textbook Requirements: Potential reading list includes: Brokeback Mountain: Story to Screenplay by Annie Proulx, Larry McMurtry, and Diana Ossana; Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh, Atonement by Ian McEwan, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K Dick, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Adaptation (script) by Charlie Kaufmann.
ENGL 240: Introduction to Film
4T
Instructor: Bernard, Marla
Catalog Description: 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 102. An introduction to the critical study of film. (23.9999).
Course Theme: Intro to Film
Course Description: With advancements in technology and broadening platforms, now is an exciting time to study film. This course offers students a sweeping introduction to the art, culture, history, industry, and experience of watching movies. Through readings, lectures, screenings, and conversation, we’ll develop the unique vocabulary of the film industry and of film criticism, and learn how the language of movies crosses cultural boundaries and media outlets. The course will survey form and genre, elements of film like cinematography and editing, as well as the social, cultural, and economic aspects of film.
Textbook Requirements:
ENGL 484. Advanced Technical and Professional Writing 5T—1:30-2:50
Instructor: Banville, Scott D.
Catalog Description: ENGL 484. Advanced Technical and Professional Writing. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 310 or 368 or BSAD 310 and junior standing. Students will practice researching, planning, and writing a variety of technical and professional documents. Students will also gain experience using a wide range of digital media. (23.1303)
Course Theme:
Course Description: For this course we will examine, evaluate, and practice a wide range of technical and professional writing. We will research, compose, edit, and design proposals, grants, newsletters, websites, social media texts, videos, forms, and other documents used in professional and technical settings. Many of the documents produced will be grounded in real world situations and we will work with clients from the University and/or the community. Students will also work in groups for projects and for individual assignments.
Textbook Requirements: Strategies for Technical Communication in the Workplace, 3rd edition by Laura J. Gurak and John M. Lannon—tentative/proposed.

Interested in Earning College Credit While Traveling to Costa Rica?

To learn more about our department’s international travel programs please contact either of the Assistant Professors listed below.  Currently, we have a study abroad program wherein students are invited to visit Costa Rica and earn college credit while doing so.  Please check back for additional planned future locations.

Contacts:

Assistant Professor Dr. Bryant Smith (Spanish)                                       Assistant Professor Dr. Robin White (French)

205A Peltier Hall                                                                                             256B Peltier Hall

985-448-4980                                                                                                  985-448-4854

james.smith@nicholls.edu                                                                          robin.white@nicholls.edu

Costa Rica Mountain Side
Costa Rica Mountain Side
Costa Rica Beach
Costa Rica Coffee Farm
Costa Rica Volcano
Costa Rica Crater
Costa Rica Fruit

Undergraduate Literature Course Offerings

Be sure to check out the Language and Literature’s course offerings in the 200 level literature courses.  We are constantly striving to introduce students to literature which is of interest to a broad spectrum of the student body.  Each semester, instructors are invited to submit a topic or theme which they would like to teach about during the following semester.  Topics / themes in the not-too-distant past have included Irish, Gothic, Fairy Tales, Seven Deadly Sins, The Bible as Literature, Women of the Bible, and Prison Literature to name just a few.  Come take a look inside and be prepared to be entranced by our newest additions. Feedback is welcomed – what do you wish to read about? A particular theme you are drawn to, or a past theme which you would like to see again – WE WISH TO HEAR FROM YOU! Email: kenna.coyle@nicholls.edu or 985-448-4453 (telephone)

2014 Undergraduate Humanities Symposium Program

Panel A–Monday, February 17 12:00-1:30 PM, Student Union Captain’s Room

Reassessing Artistic Value & Notions of Progress in Art

–Danielle Evans–Hoeniger’s Theory of Art Restoration

–Tessie Rodrigue–Mondrian’s Victory: The Evolution of Piet Mondrian’s

Painting in New York City

–Taylor LeBlanc–Austrian Artists & their Models as Muses

Moderator: Dr. Deborah Cibelli

Panel B–Tuesday, February 18, 2:00-3:15 PM, Student Union Captain’s Room

Getting a Lot out of a Little: Single Texts that Open Large Questions

 –Rosalyn Stilling–Analysis of the Body & Communication

–Brandon Naquin– “Allons!” A Universal Call to Freedom in Walt

Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road”

–Wendy Mai–The Banner of Lady Dai & her Journey Towards Immortality

 Moderator: Dr. Todd Kennedy

Panel C–Tuesday, February 18, 5:00-6:15 PM, Student Union Captain’s Room

Disciplinary Regimes: Creating, Challenging, & Critiquing

–Celeste Hope–Black Swan & The Dreamers: How The MPAA Rates Sexuality

–Kostas Smith–Modern Piracy: The Oldest Sins in the Newest Ways

Moderator: Dr. Scott Banville

The Third Annual Humanities Symposium is presented by Sigma Tau Delta, the Department of Languages & Literature, the College of Arts & Sciences, and the Student Programming Association.

PHILANTHROPIC NEWS / ACTIVITIES

The Department has, during the holiday season, begun partnering with The Haven, a shelter for victims of domestic violence and Hope for Animals, an animal shelter, both located in the LaFourche and Terrebonne Parishes. Clothes, toys, and necessities for families are purchased and wrapped from their holiday “wish lists” and donations of dog or cat items are collected and distributed.

This spring, we are also planning on adding the “spring drive” for school supplies for The Haven shelter. According to directors, there is always a substantial need for school supplies each fall, ranging from paper, pens, colors, to school clothes for teenagers. This drive will “wrap” up during the last week of the spring semester. If you have an interest to participate in either or all of these activities, we welcome any and contributions. Please contact the Languages and Literature Department at 985-448-4453 or kenna.coyle@nicholls.edu with any questions.

Wrapped Gifts
Wrapped Gifts for the Haven