Volume 4

Delving into the Mind of Faulkner’s Darl Bundren

By: Lillian LeCompte “Delving into the Mind of Faulkner’s Darl Bundren” There is no question that William Faulkner disregarded the boundaries and methodologies of “standard” writing and very well deserves his place being praised as one of today’s greatest modern writers. He did not know how to write a “normal” book. As I Lay Dying …

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A Modernist Home for Holly Golightly: From Fabricated Glamour to Functional Minimalism

By: Krista Butts “A Modernist Home for Holly Golightly: From Fabricated Glamour to Functional Minimalism”             Blake Edwards’ 1961 film, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, which is based on Truman Capote’s novella, tells the story of Holly Golightly, a girl trying to establish a glamourous identity in order to endure in the treacherous setting of New York …

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Early American Perceptions of Native American Captors

By: Hannah Sisk Reynolds In literature, comparing plots and characters is relatively easy. However, to conceptualize an aspect from a genre based upon three distinct works is more thought-provoking. Though the three captivity narratives discussed herein occur during different time frames and are acted out by different tribal groups, there are blatant similarities among them. …

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A Review of Sue Taylors article, ‘The Artist and the Analyst: Jackson Pollock’s Stenographic Figure,’ and Pollock’s Struggle for Originality

By: Tabitha Mire “A Review of Sue Taylors article, ‘The Artist and the Analyst: Jackson Pollock’s Stenographic Figure,’ and Pollock’s Struggle for Originality” Jackson Pollock’s Stenographic Figure (figure 1) was groundbreaking for American art in the 1940s. The visual interpretation of the subject of Pollock’s Stenographic Figure, made in 1942, has left art historians and …

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Gold and Wit: Congreve, Jonson, and The Evolving Ideal of Women

“Gold and Wit: Congreve, Jonson, and The Evolving Ideal of Women” By: Caitlin E Jones In 1711, Joseph Addison makes a startling claim in his article, “The Aims of The Spectator”:“there are none to whom this paper will be more useful than to the female world” (2646). The article entreats readers to educate themselves by …

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