Social Sciences

DEGREE PLANS

The Political Science major must complete course work in the four major subfields of the discipline: American Politics, International Relations, Comparative Politics, and Political Theory. A major in Political Science requires the completion of 36 hours in the discipline: GOVT 101, 250, 252, 355, 391, 416, 302 or 457 or 458, 399 or 400, 412 or 413 or 414, and 9 hours of Political Science electives at the 300+ level. No more than 6 hours of internship credit may be applied toward the requirements for a major in Political Science. A minor from another field of interest is encouraged. International Studies, History, Sociology, and Pre-law are the most common minors. All Political Science majors must successfully complete the capstone examination in order to graduate.

  • GOVT 101 – American National Government
  • GOVT 250 – Contemporary Political Ideologies
  • GOVT 252 – State and Local Government
  • GOVT 355 – Political Theory
  • GOVT 302 – American Political Behavior
    or
  • GOVT 457 – The American Congress
    or
  • GOVT 458 – The American Presidency
  • GOVT 412 – Contemporary Political Criticism
    or
  • GOVT 414 – Modern Political Thought
  • GOVT 391 – International Relations and Politics
  • GOVT 416 – Comparative Government
  • GOVT 399 – Civil Liberties
    or
  • GOVT 400 – Constitutional Law
  • GOVT 300+ –  Government Electives (9 hours)

For a complete listing of political science courses and full course descriptions, check out the catalog.

GOVERNMENT (GOVT 45.10)

GOVT 101. American National Government. 3-3-0. The principles, structure, and functions of the national government of the United States.  (45.1001)

GOVT 111. Honors American National Government. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: Honors placement or permission of department head. An in-depth analysis of the principles, structure, and functions of the national government of the United States. Degree credit will not be given for both GOVT 101 and GOVT 111. (45.1001)

GOVT 250. Contemporary Political Ideologies. 3-3-0. The moral problems of politics within the context of liberalism, conservatism, marxism and other contemporary ideological movements. (45.1001)

GOVT 252. State and Local Government. 3-3-0. State and local governmental organization and administration, with emphasis on Louisiana government. (45.1001)

GOVT 300. Political Analysis. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: Government major. Foundations and use of scientific method; approaches to a science of politics; problems of research design; methods of political inquiry. (45.1001)

GOVT 302. American Political Behavior. 3-3-0. The political process of the American electoral system; public opinion; nominations, interest groups, and parties. (45.1001)

GOVT 325. Southern Politics in America. 3-3-0. An analysis of both historical and contemporary perspectives of the politics of the American South. Topics include regional politics, political culture, party politics, and racial politics. Emphasizes changes in the culture and politics of the Southern region and the rise of the “New South.” (54.0199)

GOVT 331. Topics in Dynamics of Third World Politics. 3-3-0. Third World political processes; national and international problems, internal political change, with reference to relationships with the United States. May be repeated for credit if content differs. (45.1001)

GOVT 351. American Political Thought. 3-3-0. Development of the American liberal-democratic tradition from the colonial period to present. Emphasis on the founding period and the arguments for and against the Constitution. (45.1001)

GOVT 355. Political Theory. 3-3-0. Major political ideas from the Greeks to the present. (45.1001)

GOVT 365. Problems in American Politics. 3-3-0. Particular topics or problems in American politics. May be repeated for credit once if content differs. (45.1001)

GOVT 385. Public Administration. 3-3-0. Bureaucracy in the political system, including personnel and budgetary problems. (44.0401)

GOVT 387. Public Policy. 3-3-0. Process by which public policy is made, implemented, and evaluated, with emphasis on issues such as race, economic growth, public education, and industrial policy. (44.0501)

GOVT 391. International Relations and Politics. 3-3-0. Significant problems of world politics including such concepts as imperialism, theories of international relations and law, balance of power, international morality, sovereignty, diplomacy, problems of peace, disarmament, international organizations, trends toward world government, and a contemporary survey of world affairs. (45.0901)

GOVT 399. Civil Liberties. 3-3-0. Nature and scope of constitutional rights and liberties. Emphasis on due process of law, equal protection of the law, rights of the accused and briefing law cases. (45.1001)

GOVT 400. Constitutional Law. 3-3-0. American constitutional development with emphasis given to the landmark decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court in such selected areas as commerce, taxation, foreign affairs, and civil rights. (45.1001)

GOVT 412. Contemporary Political Criticism. 3-3-0. How contemporary theorists perceive the problems of political order, justice, freedom, and equality. (45.1001)

GOVT 413. Ancient and Medieval Political Thought. 3-3-0. An examination of key texts from Greek, Roman, and Christian political thinkers. (45.1001)

GOVT 414. Modern Political Thought. 3-3-0. Examination of key texts from prominent political thinkers from the 16th to 20th centuries. (45.1001)

GOVT 416. Comparative Government. 3-3-0. Theory, organization methods and structure of the basic types of governments operating in the world today. (45.1001)

GOVT 421. American Foreign Policy. 3-3-0. Development of American foreign policy with emphasis on the problems that evolved after World War II due to the conflict between Communist bloc and Western Democratic nations. (45.0901)

GOVT 423. International Terrorism. 3-3-0. Examination of modern terrorism, with a particular emphasis on its causes and policy implications. (45.1001)

GOVT 426. Politics of World War II. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of department head. Examination of the president’s role in wartime. Special emphasis on the political, military, and constitutional aspects of World War II. (45.1099)

GOVT 457. The American Congress. 3-3-0. A detailed examination of the workings of the national legislature. Emphasis will be on development, selection process, internal workings and proceedings, relationship with constituents and the other branches, and its policy making role. (45.1001)

GOVT 458. The American Presidency. 3-3-0. An overview of the American presidency. Emphasis on development, selection process, presidential constituents, its policy making role, and possible reforms. (45.1001)

GOVT 494. Women and Government Internship. 12-0-24. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Acceptance into the program is competitive and accompanied by scholarship. Co-requisite: GOVT 495. Students supplement their in class education with practical experience gained through full time work in or related to the public sector. Credit toward graduation may not be earned in this course and GOVT 497 or 498. No more than 6 hours of internship credit may be applied toward the requirements for a Minor in Government. (45.1001)

GOVT 495. Women and Government Seminar. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Co-requisite: GOVT 494. Analysis of the political behavior of women within the context of American political institutions. (45.1001)

GOVT 497. Governmental Internship. 6-0-12. Prerequisites: Government major, junior standing, and permission of the department head. Practical experience gained through part time work in a government agency. Credit toward graduation may not be earned in this course and GOVT 494 or 498. No more than 6 hours of internship credit may be applied toward the requirements for a Minor in Government. (45.1001)

GOVT 498. Pre Law Internship. 6-0-12. Prerequisites: Government major, junior standing, and permission of the department head. Entrance to internship program is competitive. Practical experience gained through part time work with a law firm, court or district attorney’s office. Each student must first be recommended by the faculty, then be interviewed and accepted by the employing agency. Credit toward graduation may not be earned in this course and GOVT 494 or 497. No more than 6 hours of internship credit may be applied toward the requirements for a Minor in Government. (45.1001)

GOVT 499. Seminar in Political Science. 3-3-0. Research on a special problem in one of the areas of government. May be repeated for credit if content differs. (45.1001)

All Sociology majors must pass the Sociology capstone test in order to graduate.

  • SOCI 151 – Introductory Sociology
  • SOCI 201 – Social Problems
    or
  • SOCI 204 – Cultural Diversity in American Society
  • SOCI 205 – Social Research I
  • SOCI – Social Science Elective (3 hours)
  • SOCI 305 – Social Research
  • SOCI 400 – Sociological Theory
  • SOCI 300+ – Sociolology Electives (18 hours)

For a complete listing of sociology courses and full course descriptions, check out the catalog.

SOCIOLOGY (SOCI 45.11)

SOCI 151. Introductory Sociology. 3-3-0. Theories and trends of society and social action with particular reference to life in the United States today. Degree credit will not be given for both SOCI 151 and 155.  (45.1101)

SOCI 155. Honors Introductory Sociology. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: Honors placement or permission of department head. In-dept analysis of theories and trends of society and social action with particular reference to life in the United States today. Degree credit will not be given for both SOCI 151 and SOCI 155. (45.1101)

SOCI 201. Social Problems. 3-3-0. Contemporary social problems with emphasis on American society.  (45.1101)

SOCI 204. Cultural Diversity in American Society. 3-3-0. Examines the cultural characteristics, contributions and patterns of contact of diverse groups in American society, including Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and European Americans. (45.1101)

SOCI 205. Social Research I. 3-3-0. An introduction to social science research methods and selected data analysis techniques. Registration is limited to majors and minors in Sociology, Government, Criminal Justice, and Legal Assistant Studies. (45.1101)

SOCI 300. Social Service Institutions. 3-3-0. A systematic overview of the structure of social service provision at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels of society. Examination of issues of client advocacy and empowerment, resource allocation, and the effect of social policy on the individual. (45.1101)

SOCI 302. Sociology of Aging. 3-3-0. A study of the social, political, economic, and spiritual aspects of the aging process. Theoretical perspectives of life-stage development are examined. (45.1101)

SOCI 303. Religion – A Social Force. 3-3-0. An in-depth study of major world religions, examining rituals, rites of passage, and belief systems and institutions. Focus on the direct influences to social interactions, gender issues, and global awareness. (45.1101)

SOCI 304. Community Development. 3-3-0. Study of concepts of social activism and progressive organizing relative to grass roots movements and the process of societal change. Organizational models examined and applied in a real world setting. (45.1101)

SOCI 305. Social Research II. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: SOCI 205 or permission of Instructor. Advanced concepts and applications of social science research methods and data analysis techniques. (45.1101)

SOCI 306. Case Management – Generalist Practice. 3-3-0. Skills for entry-level human service provision. Case management, effective communication, and inter-agency relations are presented with application to case history. (45.1101)

SOCI 324. Social Stratification. 3-3-0. Sources and consequences of power and privilege in the social order. Cross-cultural data are used comparing the systems of social stratification in different societies. Attention is focused on answering the question, “Who gets what and why?” (45.1101)

SOCI 325. Medical Sociology. 3-3-0. Examination of the significance of social and cultural factors in the production, service, delivery and utilization of health care. (45.1101)

SOCI 333. Sociology of Social Work. 3-3-0. Sociological theory and social work practices and how theory and research can be used to investigate and explain social phenomena. (45.1101)

SOCI 360. Population Demographics and Dynamics. 3-3-0. The basic demographic facts of size, density, births, deaths, and migration will be analyzed with special attention being paid to their effects on society. (45.0501)

SOCI 372. Selected Topics in American Society. 3-3-0. Aspects of the culture and social organization of American society. May be repeated for credit if content differs. (45.1101)

SOCI 380. Social Movements and Collective Behavior. 3-3-0. Social movements and other types of collective behavior, the conditions under which they arise and their influence on society. (45.1101)

SOCI 385. Criminology. 3-3-0. A study of theories, treatment, and prevention of criminal behavior, including penal and correctional procedures. (45.0401)

SOCI   386.   Sociology of Deviant Behavior.       3-3-0.     Causes, processes, and consequences of persons and behaviors labeled as deviant.   (45.1101)

SOCI 387. Sociology of Drug Abuse. 3-3-0. Causes, processes and consequences of the use and abuse of legal and non legal substances, including drugs and alcohol.  (45.1101)

SOCI 390. Interpersonal Violence. 3-3-0. The relationships of cultural beliefs, values, norms, sex roles and socialization to the causes, consequences and societal responses to interpersonal violence, with emphasis on rape, incest and battering. (45.1101)

SOCI 391. Families and Lifestyles. 3-3-0. An analysis of the changing values, functions, statuses and roles of the family as an institution with emphasis on the diversity of families and lifestyles today. (45.1101)

SOCI 395. Racial and Cultural Minorities. 3-3-0. The nature and the causes of dominant and subordinate groups in American and other societies. The course takes a cross cultural as well as a developmental view of the social causes and consequences of majority minority group relations. (45.1101)

SOCI 400. Sociological Theory. 3-3-0. Major theorists and their relevance to sociological research. (45.1101)

SOCI 403. Senior Internship. 6-0-12. Prerequisites: Sociology majors and permission of the department head. Practical application of sociological principles in a supervised work situation. (45.1101)

SOCI 404. Social and Cultural Change. 3-3-0. Causes, forms and consequences of social and cultural change at various levels of society. (45.1101)

SOCI 405. Globalization. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Examination of the nature, causes, and consequences of globalization. Attention will be paid to the economic, political, and socio-cultural dimensions and to the problems posed for current societies. (45.1101)

SOCI 406. Social Research III. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: SOCI 305 or   permission of Instructor.   Designed for sociology majors going to graduate school. Advanced analyses and interpretation of sociological data, their presentation suitable for reports and articles using SPSS and Microsoft Office.   (45.1101)

SOCI 424. Sociology of Disaster I. 3-3-0. An advanced course that surveys institutions, federal policies, and historical trends in disaster response management. Students will complete specific FEMA-NIMS, CDC-ERHMS, and Red Cross certifications as a major component of course work. (45.1101)

SOCI 425. Sociology of Disaster II. 3-3-0. Prerequisite: C or better in SOCI 424. An advanced course that applies disaster management knowledge to real world scenarios. Students will engage in management of mock drills and participate in an on-campus disaster training pod. (45.1101)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (Bachelor of Science)
           
FRESHMAN YEARHrsElect or SubSemGrade Extra Classes Taken
Subject     SubjectSemGrade
Engl 101 (GER)3       
Engl 102 (GER)3       
Freshman Studies (UR)1       
Hist Elective (GER)3      
Math Elective (GER)3       
Math Elective (GER)3      
Natural Science Elective (GER)3       
Computer Lit Elective (CLR)2       
CRJU 290 **3       
CRJU 291 **3      
Elective or Minor3       
 30       
      
SOPHOMORE YEARHrsElect or SubSemGrade    
Subject        
Fine Arts Elective (GER)3       
Natural Science Elective (GER)3       
Natural Science Elective (GER)3       
Spch 101 (OCR)3       
Engl Lit Elective (GER)3       
Humanities Elective (GER)3       
GOVT 101 (GER)3       
SOCI 151 OR PSYC 101 (GER)3       
CRJU 2603       
Elective or Minor3       
 30       
      
JUNIOR YEARHrsElect or SubSemGrade    
Subject        
Engl 366 (GER)3       
Hist 3203       
Approved Soc Sci Elect 300+ ***3        
Approved Soc Sci Elect 300+ ***3    **8 HRS FROM CRJU 311 (1 HR), CRJU 312 (2 HR) or CRJU 313 (3 HR)
CRJU 3063    
CRJU 3093    SubjectHrsTitleSemGrade
CRJU 4003         
CRJU 4013         
Elective or Minor3         
Elective or Minor3         
 30         
      
SENIOR YEARHrsElect or SubSemGrade      
Subject          
CRJU 311, 312, or 3138**See Across**      
CRJU 4033         
CRJU 4043         
CRJU 4053         
CRJU 4703         
CRJU 4811         
CRJU 4983         
Elective or Minor3         
Elective or Minor3         
 30     
Total Hrs120    Updated
Total Hours required for degress 120     45 hours must be courses at 300+ level
**Students holding an Associate in Criminal Justice may elect to take an advisor-approved Social Science Elective
*** Electives must be program adviser-approved. Social Science electives may include adviser approved CRJU 300+ courses; SOCI 385, 386, 387,
390, & adviser approved 372 topics; GOVT 399, 400, 423 & adviser approved 365 topics; PSYC 301, 402 & adviser approved 407 topics.

CRJU 260. Forensic Science. 3-3-0. The application of physical and biological science in solving crime, and the role forensics plays in a legal court setting.

CRJU 290. Principles of Criminal Justice I. 3-3-0. An overview of the basic concepts and principles of policing.

CRJU 291. Principles of Criminal Justice II. 3-3-0. An overview of the basic concepts and principles of the criminal justice system to include a foundation in corrections, criminal law, adjudication, criminal justice theory, and issues involving crime.

CRJU 306. Community-Based Corrections. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr standing/Major only. Correctional history, theory, and practices relating to community-based correctional programs to include a study of institutional operation, management, probation, and parole.

CRJU 309. Juvenile Delinquency. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr standing/Major only. The theory and sociological explanation behind crimes committed by youths, with an emphasis on causes, prevention, and parental and societal control.

CRJU 311. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-1-0. Prerequisites: Jr standing/Major only. The study of various topics related to Criminal Justice. (May be repeated for credit if topic differs.)

CRJU 312. Topics in Criminal Justice. 2-2-0. Prerequisites: Jr standing/Major only. The study of various topics related to Criminal Justice. (May be repeated for credit if topic differs.)

CRJU 313. Topics in Criminal Justice. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr standing/Major only. The study of various topics related to Criminal Justice. (May be repeated for credit if topic differs.)

CRJU 400. Criminal Justice Theory. 3-3-0. The theoretical foundations of criminal justice to include an examination of legal philosophy and ethics, criminal behavior, policing, the court process, and penology.

CRJU 401. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr. standing/ Majors only. The study and comparison of foreign criminal justice systems, law, and culture.

CRJU 403. Maritime Enforcement & Security. 3-3-0. The study of coastal enforcement and security issues, to include maritime law and security, port authority, the Coast Guard, and Wildlife & Fisheries.

CRJU 404. Homeland Enforcement & Security. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr. standing/ Majors only. The study of institutions, operations and issues affecting security of the nation with an emphasis on coastal enforcement and security.

CRJU 405. Industrial Enforcement & Security. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr. standing/ Majors only. The study of safety and security issues associated with coastal business and industry, to include industrial plant security, oil and gas pipeline security, and offshore platform security.

CRJU 470. Law and Society. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr. standing/ Majors only. An in-depth analysis of how societal norms, cultural values, and the interplay of interest groups shape law and the administration of justice.

CRJU 481. Diversity Seminar. 1-1-0. Prerequisites: Jr. standing/ Majors only. An overview of issues related to multiculturalism and diversity in the criminal justice system.

CRJU 498. Criminal Justice Internship. 3-3-0. Prerequisites: Jr. standing/ Majors only. Practical experience gained through supervised service-learning with an approved Criminal Justice-related agency. (May be repeated once for credit.)

Most law schools require the baccalaureate degree before admission. The College of Liberal Arts recommends a degree in political science since it is by far the most common major of those admitted into law school. We have recently placed students into the law programs at Southern University, Louisiana State University, Loyola, and the University of Southern California, often with scholarships. In the fall of their senior year, prospective law school students should take the Law School Aptitude Test (L.S.A.T.). In addition to the course requirements for the major, students should consider scheduling:

  • FACS 400 – The Family and Law
  • GOVT 399 – Civil Liberties
  • GOVT 400 – Constitutional Law
  • BSAD 221 – Legal Environment of Business
  • BSAD 324 – Commercial Law
  • MACO 370 – Law and Ethics of Mass Communication

The university awards a minor in international studies to students who successfully complete. It is a particularly good choice for Political Science and Sociology majors.

18 semester hours, including Geography 104 and 15 semester hours to be chosen from the humanities, social sciences and business concentrations listed below. The 15 hours require successful completion of:
six semester hours from two of the three concentrations listed below
and three semester hours from the remaining concentration.

Required Course

Geography 104 — World Regional Geography (3)

Humanities Concentration

Art 383 — Art History Survey (1900-Present) (3)
**English 410 — World Literature I (3)
**English 411 — World Literature II (3)
History 307 — Modern East Asia (3)
History 309 — Modern Middle East and South Asia (3)
History 334 — 20th Century Europe (3)
History 382 — English History (3)
History 393 — French History (3)
**History 400 — Russian History (3)
History 425 — Hitler and Nazi Germany (3)

Social Sciences Concentration

Government 331 — Topics and Dynamics of Third World Politics (3)
Government 391 — International Relations and Politics (3)
Government 416 — Comparative Government (3)
Government 421 — American Foreign Policy (3)
Sociology 324 — Social Stratification (3)
Sociology 360 — Population Demographics and Dynamics (3)
Sociology 372 — Special Topics: Dynamics of Change in Latin America (3)
Sociology 391 — Racial and Ethnic Relations (3)
Sociology 404 — Social and Cultural Change (3)
Sociology 405 — Globalization (3)

Business Concentration

Agricultural Science 105 — World Agriculture (3)
**Economics 435 — Principles of International Trade (3)
**Finance 450 — International France (3)
**Marketing 475 — Global Marketing (3)
Petroleum Services Technology 302 — Intercultural Communication (3)

** requires prerequisite(s)

The five required courses for the Social Work concentration include:

SOCI 300 – Social Services. In-depth analysis of the profession of social work and its effects on the individual, community, and national population. Examination of social work values and primary functions. Community, state, and federal resources, institutions, and social service programs are presented in an active learning environment.

SOCI 302 – Social work and the Aging Individual. Orients the student to the biopsychosocial aspects of the aging process. Examines and applies sociological concepts to stereotypes, special problems, and policies and programs directed toward the aging individual. Presents a contemporary view on later life development.

SOCI 303 – Religion: A Social Force. Academic study of religion focusing on the pattern of beliefs and practices of contemporary global modern societies. Specific analysis of the cognitive, ethical, ritual, institutional, aesthetic, and emotional dimensions will be applied to enhance an understanding of cultural religious practices.

SOCI 304 – Community Development. : Study of concepts of social activism and progressive organizing relative to grass roots movements and the process of societal change. Organizational models examined and applied in a real world setting.

SOCI 306 – Case Management – Generalist Practice. Skills for entry level human service provision. Case management, effective communication, and inter-agency relations are presented with application to case history.

The student may choose one of the following courses to fulfill the concentration:

SOCI 325 – Medical Sociology. This course examines the significance of social and cultural factors in the productions, service, delivery and utilization of health care.

SOCI 333 – Sociology of Social Work. This course illuminates the bridge between basic sociological theory and how that theory can be of practical use to social workers.

SOCI 372 – Selected Topics. This course will be utilized to provide specific topical courses relative to current trends in social work.

NURS 352. Perspectives on Death and Dying. 3-3-0. A multidisciplinary overview of death and dying. Explores death as a personal phenomenon. Information sharing, values clarification, and coping behaviors are emphasized. Open to non-nursing students.