4-YEAR BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS

PETROLEUM ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (PETC)

Program Description

The University awards the Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering Technology to the student who completes the course work listed below. The curriculum is designed for personnel employed in the petroleum industry or for those seeking employment in the petroleum industry while attending school. All classes are scheduled to permit attendance of persons employed on a rotational schedule up to fourteen-days-on/fourteen-days-off. The curriculum focuses on technical, people‑oriented, and industrial application courses to prepare the student for middle‑to‑upper level management positions in drilling or production operations, or for the service and supply segment of the petroleum industry.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students should be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving abilities using basic principles of scientific concepts.
  • Prepare technical information within project teams in a professional manner.
  • Set personal career and financial goals, including personal investment, planning, financial management and a life-long learning plan.
  • Obtain gainful entry level employment leading to leadership positions in the regional, national and global energy industry.
  • Demonstrate technical competencies within the Petroleum Engineering degree.

Curriculum – 120 hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 121

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: MATH 101.  Create charts, graphs, and tables using computational software with emphasis on algebra, geometry and trigonometry to solve applied problems in the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 171

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Introduction to well drilling equipment, processes and types of well drilling operations on land, offshore and deep-water developments.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 231

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

The equipment, instrumentation and problems involved in the controlling, treating, measuring, and testing of natural gas.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 241

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Mechanical, hydraulic, and other methods to control problems associated with free flowing and artificially lifted well fluids. Emphasis on subsea equipment, operations and Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) deep-water vessel operations.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 301

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Concepts and principles of management and communication as they relate to the utilization of human resources within the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 305

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: PSET 121. Concepts of economics as applied to the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 310

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121 and PSET 231. Pneumatic, hydraulic, electrical and mechanical control, and safety systems with embedded course lab exercises.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 331

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121 and PSET 231. Artificial lift methods employed in the extraction of well bore fluids. Includes gas lift, hydraulic, electrical and rod pumping design, installation, and operation.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 371

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121 and PSET 171. Nature and control of drilling fluids as applied to drilling practices with embedded course lab exercises.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 381

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121 and PSET 171. Well completion practices including safety devices, fracking, sand, and horizontal control. Emphasis on operations of service and repair of oil and gas wells using rigs, wireline, coil tubing, and snubbing technologies.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 384

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121, 171 and 371. Factors leading to well kicks, methods of controlling these factors: the equipment and procedures used to control kicks with embedded course lab exercises.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 401

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. Supervised industrial work experience, externship or internship related to academic studies. Students must arrange an externship or internship prior to enrolling.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 431

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121, 231 and 241. Directed study of chemical, physical and behavioral properties of hydrocarbon and other fluids in the reservoir and reservoir rock properties. Includes embedded labs.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 452

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Permission of department head for PETSM graduating seniors. Research of approved topic under faculty supervision. Emphasis on developing a hypothesis, designing path of investigation, collecting and analyzing data, writing a research report and making a formal presentation. Course includes formal competency assessment of program goals.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 477

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: PSET 121 and PSET 171. Equipment methods and procedures used to evaluate the wellbore and the productivity of production wells.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Fundamentals of the regulatory rulemaking process, standards of machines, equipment, material, employees, power sources, as established by Occupational Safety and Health Act, Bureau of Safety Environmental Enforcement, United States Coast Guard, Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and Environmental Protection Agency. 

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 112

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Accident prevention with emphasis on risk identification, risk assessment, controls, auditing and program management.  Includes reporting, recordkeeping, investigation, worker compensation, cost factors and remedial factors.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 220

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Design, development, delivery and management of safety, health and environmental management training programs.  Emphasis on adult learning principles, learning objectives, lesson plans, skills in conducting group meetings, organizing and presenting technical information and human communications.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 230

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

History, scope, and effect of alcohol and drug laws and regulationrelated workforce problems. Scope and cost of these problems with signs, causal theories, and treatment as related to company programs. Roles of supervisors and management of workplace DOT and non-DOT Drug and Alcohol testing programs are explored.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 240

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Accident prevention as related to the maritime aspect of the petroleum industry. Emphasis on domestic and international jurisdictions governing safety and environmental management and marine operations.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 440

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Concepts and principles of risk assessment and mitigation, emergency planning, response and recovery to man-made and natural disasters including hazardous materials releases, civil disturbances, mass casualty disasters, flooding and hurricanes. Topics include Incident Command Systems (ICS), mutual aid, training, preparedness and communications.

COURSE NUMBER

Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

COURSE NUMBER

Elective

CREDIT HOURS

6

TOTAL

72hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

UNIV 101

CREDIT HOURS

1

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

First time entering freshmen and transfer students with less than 30 hours. Helps students adjust to the university, provides a support system and promotes understanding of the  requirements of the major. Career exploration/assessment pertinent to the major.  Satisfies university freshman seminar requirement.

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: Initial placement by ACT score of 18 or better in English, or C or better in ENGL 003, or satisfactory score on departmental placement test. Introduction to expository writing and critical thinking.

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 102

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 100 or 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. Further development of writing in various genres and critical thinking with an introduction to research. C or better in ENGL 102 is required for graduation.

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 003, C or better in MATH 115, or Grade of D in MATH 100, or Math ACT Subscore of 21 or better, or satisfactory score on placement test. Linear equations and inequalities, linear applications, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations and inequalities, absolute-value equations and inequalities, radical equations, functions and graphs, polynomial and exponential and logarithmic functions.  For MATH 101 WWW (web), priority is given to students enrolling in MATH 101 for the first time. Credit in MATH 100 is equivalent to MATH 101

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 214

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 100, 101, 115, 116, or 117. Organizing data, averages and variations, stem-and-leaf and box plots and other graphical presentations of data, conducting experiments, elementary probability theory, distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.  [LCCN: CMAT 1303] (27.0101)

COURSE NUMBER

Humanities Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 280. Art History Survey I.
ART 281. Art History Survey II.
ART 282. Art History Survey III.
ART 383. Art History Survey IV.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
ART 392. Readings in Art History.
ART 393. Honors Readings in Art History.
CULA 101. Culinary History and Development.
ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
ENGL 240. Introduction to Film.
ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
ENGL 326. Introduction to Folklore.
ENGL 332. Drama.
ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
FREN 101. Elementary French I.
FREN 102. Elementary French II.
FREN 309. Children’s Literature.
FREN 310. Francophone Culture and Civilization.
FREN 315. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 324. Advanced French Language Skills Through Immersion.
FREN 330. Advanced French Conversation.
FREN 350. Introduction to Commercial French.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.
HIST 160. Honors World History I.
HIST 161. Honors World History II.HIST 201. History of Women.

COURSE NUMBER

Social Sciences Electives

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CRJU 101. Introduction to Criminal Justice.
CRJU 201. Applied Criminology.
CRJU 202. Public and Community Relations.
CRJU 203. Criminal Related Law.
CRJU 204. Police Administration.
CRJU 220. Adjudication Process.
CRJU 305. Introduction to Corrections.
ECON 211. Principles of Microeconomics.
ECON 212. Principles of Macroeconomics.
ECON 255. Survey of Economic Principles.
ECON 322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
GEOG 103. Physical Geography.
GEOG 104. World Regional Geography.
GOVT 101. American National Government.
GOVT 250. Contemporary Political Ideologies.
GOVT 252. State and Local Government.
GOVT 351. American Political Thought.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
GOVT 391. International Relations and Politics.
GOVT 399. Civil Liberties.
SOCI 151. Introductory Sociology
SOCI 155. Honors Introductory Sociology
SOCI 201. Social Problems
SOCI 204. Cultural Diversity in American Society
SOCI 205. Social Research I
SOCI 300. Social Service Institutions
SOCI 302: Sociology of Aging
SOCI 303. Religion — A Social Force
SOCI 304. Community Development
SOCI 306. Case Management
SOCI 324. Social Stratification
SOCI 325. Medical Sociology
SOCI 333. Sociology of Social Work
SOCI 360. Population Demographics and Dynamics
SOCI 380. Social Movements and Collective Behavior
SOCI 385. Criminology
SOCI 386. Sociology of Deviant Behavior
SOCI 387. Sociology of Drug Abuse
SOCI 390. Interpersonal Violence
SOCI 391. Families and Lifestyles
SOCI 395. Racial and Cultural Minorities
PSYC 101. General Psychology.
PSYC 206. Child Psychology.

COURSE NUMBER

Physical Science Electives

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ASTR 101. Astronomy of the Solar System.
ASTR 102. Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies.
CHEM 101. General Chemistry I.
CHEM 102. General Chemistry II.
CHEM 105. Introductory Chemistry I.
CHEM 106. Introductory Chemistry II.
CHEM 109. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry for Nursing.
CHEM 208. Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Health Sciences.
GEOL 101. Physical Geology.
GEOL 102. Historical Geology.
GEOL 300. Oceanography.
GEOL 370. Environmental Geology
PHSC 101. Introductory Physical Science I.
PHSC 102. Introductory Physical Science II.
PHSC 103. Introductory Physical Science III.
PHYS 101. Basic Physics.
PHYS 102. Basic Physics.
PHYS 151. Physics for Allied Health.
PHYS 201. General Physics.
PHYS 202. General Physics.

COURSE NUMBER

Fine Art Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 201. Beginning Drawing.
ART 211. Beginning Painting.
ART 221. Beginning Printmaking.
ART 231. Beginning Ceramics.
ART 240. Sculptural and Three-Dimensional Design.
ART 261. Beginning Photography.
ART 280. Art History: Ancient Art.
ART 281. Art History: Non-Western Art.
ART 282. Art History: Italian Renaissance Art.
ART 383. Art History: Modern Art.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
FNAR 105. Arts in Education.
FNAR 301. Fine Arts Survey I.
FNAR 302. Fine Arts Survey II.
FNAR 303. Topics in Fine Arts.
MUS 101. Basic Piano.
MUS 102. Basic Piano.
MUS 104. Basic Voice.
MUS 105. General Music Appreciation.
MUS 107. Honors Music Appreciation.
MUS 319. Jazz History.
MUS 320. History of Rock and Roll.
MUS 407. World Music.

COURSE NUMBER

Computer Literacy Elective

CREDIT HOURS

2

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CMPS 107. Computer Literacy Concepts and Word Processing.
CMPS 108. Computer Literacy Spreadsheets
CMPS 109. Computer Literacy Presentation Software
CMPS 130. Introduction to Computer Science I
CMPS 200. Computing Technology for Science Majors
CMPS 207. Computer Literacy Advanced Word Processing
CMPS 208. Computer Literacy Advanced Spreadsheets
CMPS 209. Computer Literacy Database Software
EDUC 251. Introduction to Technology Integration for Teachers
MNTC 110. Computers for Manufacturing Technology
MACO 322. Publication Design for Mass Communication
MACO 362. Broadcast Media Workshop
MUS 20. Computing Technology for Music Majors
OIS 200. Computers in the Office

COURSE NUMBER

History Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.
HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.

COURSE NUMBER

Biology Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

BIOL 105. Basic Biology I – Principles of Biology.
BIOL 106. Basic Biology II – The Diversity of Life.
BIOL 114. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
BIOL 116. Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
BIOL 124. Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
BIOL 126. Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
BIOL 155. General Biology I.
BIOL 156. General Biology II.
BIOL 206. Tropical Biology I: Pacific slope.
BIOL 207. Tropical Biology II: Caribbean slope.
BIOL 215. Pirogue Biology

COURSE NUMBER

English Literature Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
ENGL 215. Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature.
ENGL 216. Appreciation of Literary Genres.
ENGL 217. Survey of Literary and Media Studies.
ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
ENGL 332. Drama.
ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
SPAN 351. Introduction to Spanish Literature.
SPAN 355. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature.

COURSE NUMBER

Writing Intensive Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ENGL 265, 310, 366, 368, 468,
BSAD 310
MACO 251

COURSE NUMBER

Oral Communications Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 251. 
ENGL 304. 
EDUC 456, 457, 458, 461, 465, 483.
FCED 262, 239.
Collective completion of NURS 340, 371, and 422.
SPCH 101, 104, or 105.
SPCH 363.
Collective completion of MUS 211, 212, 272, 340, and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 223, 225, 227, 383, 385,
and MUS 272, 302 and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 383, 384, 478 and MUS 272, 303, and 341.

TOTAL

48

Core Compentencies

  1. Interpret and apply information pertaining to business or operations (e.g. regulations; industry consensus standards; reference databases; injury and illness statistics; etc.) to case studies and technical problems using appropriate data.
  2. Explain the operational scope, application and purpose that compose the three separate and discrete sectors of the petroleum industry (upstream, midstream and downstream).
  3. Explain the oil field vocabulary, common methods, typical materials, tools and equipment that are used in the oil and gas industry.
  4. Apply general economic theory to assess viability of petroleum engineering projects, calculate return on investment and determine injury and illness loss impact on company profitability.
  5. Evaluate risk and operational practices in accordance with accepted survey methodology (e.g., observing the facility; referring to process flow charts; Process & Instrumentation Diagram (PID’s), verifying safety and health systems; auditing programs and documentation; and interviewing applicable stakeholders) in order to recognize hazards and controls.
  6. Effectively formulate, communicate and implement solutions to technical and HSE problems in a professional environment.
  7. Investigate incidents, near misses and operational failures using established techniques to determine root causes, identify trends and formulate or update corrective action plans.
  8. Design, develop, deliver and manage health, safety and environmental training following industry accepted practices.
  9. Demonstrate leadership abilities to effectively work and interact in a team environment.
  10. Achieve industry recognized certification for well control, production safety systems and health, safety & environmental practices.
  11. Explain wellbore design and calculate bottom-hole pressures to maintain well integrity.
  12. Explain basic well completion steps taken to transform a drilled well into a producing one (e.g., casing, cementing, perforating, gravel packing and installing production tree).
  13. Apply well logging data with basic core data in order to understand property formation lithology, porosity, permeability and fluid saturation given basic rock-fluid system data.
  14. Assess and respond to abnormal operating conditions during the drilling or production process where inherent catastrophic risks are involved (lost circulation, high pressure zones, etc.)
  15. Describe primary, secondary and enhanced oil production methods involving extraction of hydrocarbons.
  16. Calculate mud weight necessary to maintain well control and volume of mud required to fill the hole while pulling drill pipe from the well.
  17. Understand causes of well kicks, positive indications of kicks, and six common well control methods for controlling kicks while drilling.
  18. Explain process safety controls and methods involving level, pressure, flow and temperature in a production safety system.

SAFETY MANAGEMENT (SMGT)

Program Description

The Safety Management Program is designed for those looking to advance their knowledge and education in safety management and for those seeking to advance their career in the field of safety. As a student in this program, you take courses in safety education and training strategies, safety management in business and industry, risk assessment, and safety and health program design. You learn to facilitate the delivery of effective safety education and training, use analytical methods to determine and manage risk, and evaluate and control workplace hazards. In addition, a large focus will be placed on developing, implementing, and evaluating safety and health programs.  All classes are scheduled to permit attendance of persons employed on a rotational schedule up to fourteen-days-on/fourteen-days-off. The curriculum focuses on technical, people‑oriented, and industrial application courses to prepare the student for middle‑to‑upper level management positions in safety.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students should be able to do the following:

  • Research problems using basic principles of scientific concepts.
  • Communicate technical health, safety and environmental information to team members in a professional manner.
  • Understand the importance of training, continued education and professional development for career advancement.
  • Obtain gainful entry-level employment as a field safety technologist in a petroleum industry and beyond.
  • Demonstrate technical competencies within the Safety Management degree.

Curriculum – 120hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Fundamentals of the regulatory rulemaking process, standards of machines, equipment, material, employees, power sources, as established by Occupational Safety and Health Act, Bureau of Safety Environmental Enforcement, United States Coast Guard, Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and Environmental Protection Agency.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 112

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Accident prevention with emphasis on risk identification, risk assessment, controls, auditing and program management.  Includes reporting, recordkeeping, investigation, worker compensation, cost factors and remedial factors.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 220

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Design, development, delivery and management of safety, health and environmental management training programs.  Emphasis on adult learning principles, learning objectives, lesson plans, skills in conducting group meetings, organizing and presenting technical information and human communications.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 230

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

History, scope, and effect of alcohol and drug laws and regulationrelated workforce problems. Scope and cost of these problems with signs, causal theories, and treatment as related to company programs. Roles of supervisors and management of workplace DOT and non-DOT Drug and Alcohol testing programs are explored.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 240

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Accident prevention as related to the maritime aspect of the petroleum industry. Emphasis on domestic and international jurisdictions governing safety and environmental management and marine operations.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 325

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Concepts and principles of risk assessment and mitigation, emergency planning, response and recovery to man-made and natural disasters including hazardous materials releases, civil disturbances, mass casualty disasters, flooding and hurricanes. Topics include Incident Command Systems (ICS), mutual aid, training, preparedness and communications.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 375

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Industrial hygiene practices, engineering controls and medical surveillance programs for petroleum occupational exposures. Course includes embedded lab exercises for exposure sampling procedures and strategies for determination of occupational exposure limits. 

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 380

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

SATC 101. Ergonomics principles and applications of the science involving human capacities and limitations to the design of workplaces, jobs, tasks, tools, equipment, and the environment. Emphasis on cumulative trauma, disorders, defining, ergonomics, analysis of ergonomic risk factors in the workplace and designing engineering and administrative control strategies with embedded course lab exercises.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 385

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Management practices, standards, regulations and permitting for hazardous waste handling, transportation, storage, cleanup and disposal activities. Special emphasis on emergency responder safety management practices. 

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 420

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Analysis and application of standards criteria, methodologies, and continuous improvement practices involving ANSI (American National Standards Institute) and ISO (International Standards Organization) environmental, safety and health and quality control management systems applicable to the global petroleum exploration and production industry. 

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 440

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Environmental monitoring and assessment of source pollutants applicable to safe and environmental-friendly petroleum exploration and production with embedded course lab exercises. Emphasis on water and air environmental permit management.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 450

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. General industry safety and health standards as required by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Students may obtain the OSHA 10 Hour – General Industry Student Course Completion Card subject to OSHA Outreach Training program rules and PETSM department guidelines.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 480

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: SATC 101. Construction industry safety and health standards as required by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Students may obtain the OSHA 10 Hour – Construction Student Course Completion Card subject to OSHA Outreach Program rules and PETSM department guidelines.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 121

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: MATH 101.  Create charts, graphs, and tables using computational software with emphasis on algebra, geometry and trigonometry to solve applied problems in the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 171

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Introduction to well drilling equipment, processes and types of well drilling operations on land, offshore and deep-water developments. 

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 231

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

The equipment, instrumentation and problems involved in the controlling, treating, measuring, and testing of natural gas. 

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 241

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Mechanical, hydraulic, and other methods to control problems associated with free flowing and artificially lifted well fluids. Emphasis on subsea equipment, operations and Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) deep-water vessel operations. 

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 301

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Concepts and principles of management and communication as they relate to the utilization of human resources within the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 305

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: PSET 121. Concepts of economics as applied to the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 401

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. Supervised industrial work experience, externship or internship related to academic studies. Students must arrange an externship or internship prior to enrolling. 

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 452

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Permission of department head for PETSM graduating seniors. Research of approved topic under faculty supervision. Emphasis on developing a hypothesis, designing path of investigation, collecting and analyzing data, writing a research report and making a formal presentation. Course includes formal competency assessment of program goals.

COURSE NUMBER

Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

COURSE NUMBER

Elective

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

72

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

UNIV 101

CREDIT HOURS

1

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

First time entering freshmen and transfer students with less than 30 hours. Helps students adjust to the university, provides a support system and promotes understanding of the  requirements of the major. Career exploration/assessment pertinent to the major.  Satisfies university freshman seminar requirement.

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: Initial placement by ACT score of 18 or better in English, or C or better in ENGL 003, or satisfactory score on departmental placement test. Introduction to expository writing and critical thinking.

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 102

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 100 or 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. Further development of writing in various genres and critical thinking with an introduction to research. C or better in ENGL 102 is required for graduation.

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 003, C or better in MATH 115, or Grade of D in MATH 100, or Math ACT Subscore of 21 or better, or satisfactory score on placement test. Linear equations and inequalities, linear applications, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations and inequalities, absolute-value equations and inequalities, radical equations, functions and graphs, polynomial and exponential and logarithmic functions.  For MATH 101 WWW (web), priority is given to students enrolling in MATH 101 for the first time. Credit in MATH 100 is equivalent to MATH 101

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 214

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 100, 101, 115, 116, or 117. Organizing data, averages and variations, stem-and-leaf and box plots and other graphical presentations of data, conducting experiments, elementary probability theory, distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.  [LCCN: CMAT 1303] (27.0101)

COURSE NUMBER

Humanities Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 280. Art History Survey I.
ART 281. Art History Survey II.
ART 282. Art History Survey III.
ART 383. Art History Survey IV.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
ART 392. Readings in Art History.
ART 393. Honors Readings in Art History.
CULA 101. Culinary History and Development.
ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
ENGL 240. Introduction to Film.
ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
ENGL 326. Introduction to Folklore.
ENGL 332. Drama.
ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
FREN 101. Elementary French I.
FREN 102. Elementary French II.
FREN 309. Children’s Literature.
FREN 310. Francophone Culture and Civilization.
FREN 315. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 324. Advanced French Language Skills Through Immersion.
FREN 330. Advanced French Conversation.
FREN 350. Introduction to Commercial French.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.
HIST 160. Honors World History I.
HIST 161. Honors World History II.HIST 201. History of Women.

COURSE NUMBER

Social Sciences Electives

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CRJU 101. Introduction to Criminal Justice.
CRJU 201. Applied Criminology.
CRJU 202. Public and Community Relations.
CRJU 203. Criminal Related Law.
CRJU 204. Police Administration.
CRJU 220. Adjudication Process.
CRJU 305. Introduction to Corrections.
ECON 211. Principles of Microeconomics.
ECON 212. Principles of Macroeconomics.
ECON 255. Survey of Economic Principles.
ECON 322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
GEOG 103. Physical Geography.
GEOG 104. World Regional Geography.
GOVT 101. American National Government.
GOVT 250. Contemporary Political Ideologies.
GOVT 252. State and Local Government.
GOVT 351. American Political Thought.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
GOVT 391. International Relations and Politics.
GOVT 399. Civil Liberties.
SOCI 151. Introductory Sociology
SOCI 155. Honors Introductory Sociology
SOCI 201. Social Problems
SOCI 204. Cultural Diversity in American Society
SOCI 205. Social Research I
SOCI 300. Social Service Institutions
SOCI 302: Sociology of Aging
SOCI 303. Religion — A Social Force
SOCI 304. Community Development
SOCI 306. Case Management
SOCI 324. Social Stratification
SOCI 325. Medical Sociology
SOCI 333. Sociology of Social Work
SOCI 360. Population Demographics and Dynamics
SOCI 380. Social Movements and Collective Behavior
SOCI 385. Criminology
SOCI 386. Sociology of Deviant Behavior
SOCI 387. Sociology of Drug Abuse
SOCI 390. Interpersonal Violence
SOCI 391. Families and Lifestyles
SOCI 395. Racial and Cultural Minorities
PSYC 101. General Psychology.
PSYC 206. Child Psychology.

COURSE NUMBER

Physical Science Electives

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ASTR 101. Astronomy of the Solar System.
ASTR 102. Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies.
CHEM 101. General Chemistry I.
CHEM 102. General Chemistry II.
CHEM 105. Introductory Chemistry I.
CHEM 106. Introductory Chemistry II.
CHEM 109. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry for Nursing.
CHEM 208. Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Health Sciences.
GEOL 101. Physical Geology.
GEOL 102. Historical Geology.
GEOL 300. Oceanography.
GEOL 370. Environmental Geology
PHSC 101. Introductory Physical Science I.
PHSC 102. Introductory Physical Science II.
PHSC 103. Introductory Physical Science III.
PHYS 101. Basic Physics.
PHYS 102. Basic Physics.
PHYS 151. Physics for Allied Health.
PHYS 201. General Physics.
PHYS 202. General Physics.

COURSE NUMBER

Fine Art Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 201. Beginning Drawing.
ART 211. Beginning Painting.
ART 221. Beginning Printmaking.
ART 231. Beginning Ceramics.
ART 240. Sculptural and Three-Dimensional Design.
ART 261. Beginning Photography.
ART 280. Art History: Ancient Art.
ART 281. Art History: Non-Western Art.
ART 282. Art History: Italian Renaissance Art.
ART 383. Art History: Modern Art.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
FNAR 105. Arts in Education.
FNAR 301. Fine Arts Survey I.
FNAR 302. Fine Arts Survey II.
FNAR 303. Topics in Fine Arts.
MUS 101. Basic Piano.
MUS 102. Basic Piano.
MUS 104. Basic Voice.
MUS 105. General Music Appreciation.
MUS 107. Honors Music Appreciation.
MUS 319. Jazz History.
MUS 320. History of Rock and Roll.
MUS 407. World Music.

COURSE NUMBER

Computer Literacy Elective

CREDIT HOURS

2

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CMPS 107. Computer Literacy Concepts and Word Processing.
CMPS 108. Computer Literacy Spreadsheets
CMPS 109. Computer Literacy Presentation Software
CMPS 130. Introduction to Computer Science I
CMPS 200. Computing Technology for Science Majors
CMPS 207. Computer Literacy Advanced Word Processing
CMPS 208. Computer Literacy Advanced Spreadsheets
CMPS 209. Computer Literacy Database Software
EDUC 251. Introduction to Technology Integration for Teachers
MNTC 110. Computers for Manufacturing Technology
MACO 322. Publication Design for Mass Communication
MACO 362. Broadcast Media Workshop
MUS 20. Computing Technology for Music Majors
OIS 200. Computers in the Office

COURSE NUMBER

History Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.
HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.

COURSE NUMBER

Biology Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

BIOL 105. Basic Biology I – Principles of Biology.
BIOL 106. Basic Biology II – The Diversity of Life.
BIOL 114. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
BIOL 116. Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
BIOL 124. Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
BIOL 126. Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
BIOL 155. General Biology I.
BIOL 156. General Biology II.
BIOL 206. Tropical Biology I: Pacific slope.
BIOL 207. Tropical Biology II: Caribbean slope.
BIOL 215. Pirogue Biology

COURSE NUMBER

English Literature Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
ENGL 215. Introduction to Thematic Approaches to Literature.
ENGL 216. Appreciation of Literary Genres.
ENGL 217. Survey of Literary and Media Studies.
ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
ENGL 332. Drama.
ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
SPAN 351. Introduction to Spanish Literature.
SPAN 355. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature.

COURSE NUMBER

Writing Intensive Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ENGL 265, 310, 366, 368, 468,
BSAD 310
MACO 251

COURSE NUMBER

Oral Communications Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 251. 
ENGL 304. 
EDUC 456, 457, 458, 461, 465, 483.
FCED 262, 239.
Collective completion of NURS 340, 371, and 422.
SPCH 101, 104, or 105.
SPCH 363.
Collective completion of MUS 211, 212, 272, 340, and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 223, 225, 227, 383, 385,
and MUS 272, 302 and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 383, 384, 478 and MUS 272, 303, and 341.

TOTAL

48

Core Compentencies

Graduates will demonstrate the following knowledge, skills and abilities:

  1. Interpret and apply information pertaining to business or operations (e.g. regulations; industry consensus standards; reference databases; injury and illness statistics; etc.) to case studies and technical problems using appropriate data.
  2. Explain the operational scope, application and purpose that compose the three separate and discrete sectors of the petroleum industry (upstream, midstream and downstream).
  3. Explain the oil field vocabulary, common methods, typical materials, tools and equipment that are used in the oil and gas industry.
  4. Apply general economic theory to assess viability of petroleum engineering projects, calculate return on investment and determine injury and illness loss impact on company profitability.
  5. Evaluate risk and operational practices in accordance with accepted survey methodology (e.g., observing the facility; referring to process flow charts; Process & Instrumentation Diagram (PID’s), verifying safety and health systems; auditing programs and documentation; and interviewing applicable stakeholders) in order to recognize hazards and controls.
  6. Effectively formulate, communicate and implement solutions to technical and HSE problems in a professional environment.
  7. Investigate incidents, near misses and operational failures using established techniques to determine root causes, identify trends and formulate or update corrective action plans.
  8. Design, develop, deliver and manage health, safety and environmental training following industry accepted practices.
  9. Demonstrate leadership abilities to effectively work and interact in a team environment.
  10. Achieve industry recognized certification for well control, production safety systems and health, safety & environmental practices.

     

  11. Select hazard control measures by reviewing options and choosing the most appropriate to manage the risk (i.e., elimination; substitution; engineering; administrative; training; and PPE).

  12. Assist with the implementation of controls (e.g., organized committees; safety teams; providing or conducting training; maintaining records; collaboration with contractors; selection of equipment; managing regulatory program and safety program records) in order to manage risk.

  13. Verify that recommended hazard controls are implemented using management and evaluation techniques (e.g., site surveys; review of records, audits; interviews with key personnel; and follow-up with the responsible individuals) and strategies to management and employees through organized committees, training, recommendations and justifications for the actions to manage current and potential loss scenarios.

  14. Access the effectiveness of hazard controls by analyzing performance data (e.g., behavior safety observations; job safety analysis; short service employee programs; stop work authority programs; loss data; and incident rates) in order to ensure risks are adequately managed.

  15. Identify catastrophic and emergency response scenarios (e.g., fires/explosions; process safety events; natural disasters; chemical releases; terrorism; and medical emergencies) using established techniques in order to anticipate risks.

  16. Develop and document action plans for responding to disasters and other emergencies.

  17. Provide support to incident command operations to manage responses to disasters and other emergencies.

  18. Understand the organizational roles and responsibilities for safety among management, supervisors, employees and the safety, health and environmental technologist.

2-YEAR ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

ASSOCIATE of PETROLEUM SERVICES (PSAS)

Program Description

The Petroleum Services Associate of Science degree is both a stand-a-lone degree and a foundation for the two plus two (2+2) degree pathway. The courses that make up the 60 credit hours within the associate degree are embedded into the Petroleum Engineering Technology (PETC) degree.  These courses set the foundation for the bachelor’s of science degree.  Students will often choose to graduate in 2 years with an associate degree and continue for another 2 years to complete the bachelor’s degree. Many also become employed in the industry by way of the unique course scheduling offered in the PETSM program, those students may earn a bachelor’s degree while working. 

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students should be able to do the following:

  • Research problems using basic principles of scientific concepts.
  • Communicate technical health, safety and environmental information to team members in a professional manner.
  • Understand the importance of training, continued education and professional development for career advancement.
  • Obtain gainful entry-level employment as a field safety technologist in industry and beyond.

Curriculum – 60hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 121

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: MATH 101.  Create charts, graphs, and tables using computational software with emphasis on algebra, geometry and trigonometry to solve applied problems in the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 171

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Introduction to well drilling equipment, processes and types of well drilling operations on land, offshore and deep-water developments.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 231

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

The equipment, instrumentation and problems involved in the controlling, treating, measuring, and testing of natural gas.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 241

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Mechanical, hydraulic, and other methods to control problems associated with free flowing and artificially lifted well fluids. Emphasis on subsea equipment, operations and Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) deep-water vessel operations.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 295

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Permission of department head for graduating students in the Petroleum Services Associate of Science. Analysis and synthesis of knowledge and skills obtained in their studies relative to a career in upstream oil and gas industry. Course requires a summative portfolio and formal competency assessment.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Fundamentals of the regulatory rulemaking process, standards of machines, equipment, material, employees, power sources, as established by Occupational Safety and Health Act, Bureau of Safety Environmental Enforcement, United States Coast Guard, Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and Environmental Protection Agency. 

COURSE NUMBER

SATC Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

24hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

UNIV 101

CREDIT HOURS

1

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

First time entering freshmen and transfer students with less than 30 hours. Helps students adjust to the university, provides a support system and promotes understanding of the  requirements of the major. Career exploration/assessment pertinent to the major.  Satisfies university freshman seminar requirement.

COURSE NUMBER

Computer Literacy Elective

CREDIT HOURS

2

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CMPS 107. Computer Literacy Concepts and Word Processing.
CMPS 108. Computer Literacy Spreadsheets
CMPS 109. Computer Literacy Presentation Software
CMPS 130. Introduction to Computer Science I
CMPS 200. Computing Technology for Science Majors
CMPS 207. Computer Literacy Advanced Word Processing
CMPS 208. Computer Literacy Advanced Spreadsheets
CMPS 209. Computer Literacy Database Software
EDUC 251. Introduction to Technology Integration for Teachers
MNTC 110. Computers for Manufacturing Technology
MACO 322. Publication Design for Mass Communication
MACO 362. Broadcast Media Workshop
MUS 20. Computing Technology for Music Majors
OIS 200. Computers in the Office

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: Initial placement by ACT score of 18 or better in English, or C or better in ENGL 003, or satisfactory score on departmental placement test. Introduction to expository writing and critical thinking.

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 102

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 100 or 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. Further development of writing in various genres and critical thinking with an introduction to research. C or better in ENGL 102 is required for graduation.

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 003, C or better in MATH 115, or Grade of D in MATH 100, or Math ACT Subscore of 21 or better, or satisfactory score on placement test. Linear equations and inequalities, linear applications, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations and inequalities, absolute-value equations and inequalities, radical equations, functions and graphs, polynomial and exponential and logarithmic functions.  For MATH 101 WWW (web), priority is given to students enrolling in MATH 101 for the first time. Credit in MATH 100 is equivalent to MATH 101

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 214

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 100, 101, 115, 116, or 117. Organizing data, averages and variations, stem-and-leaf and box plots and other graphical presentations of data, conducting experiments, elementary probability theory, distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.  [LCCN: CMAT 1303] (27.0101)

COURSE NUMBER

Humanities Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 280. Art History Survey I.
ART 281. Art History Survey II.
ART 282. Art History Survey III.
ART 383. Art History Survey IV.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
ART 392. Readings in Art History.
ART 393. Honors Readings in Art History.
CULA 101. Culinary History and Development.
ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
ENGL 240. Introduction to Film.
ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
ENGL 326. Introduction to Folklore.
ENGL 332. Drama.
ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
FREN 101. Elementary French I.
FREN 102. Elementary French II.
FREN 309. Children’s Literature.
FREN 310. Francophone Culture and Civilization.
FREN 315. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 324. Advanced French Language Skills Through Immersion.
FREN 330. Advanced French Conversation.
FREN 350. Introduction to Commercial French.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.
HIST 160. Honors World History I.
HIST 161. Honors World History II.HIST 201. History of Women.

COURSE NUMBER

Social Sciences Electives

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CRJU 101. Introduction to Criminal Justice.
CRJU 201. Applied Criminology.
CRJU 202. Public and Community Relations.
CRJU 203. Criminal Related Law.
CRJU 204. Police Administration.
CRJU 220. Adjudication Process.
CRJU 305. Introduction to Corrections.
ECON 211. Principles of Microeconomics.
ECON 212. Principles of Macroeconomics.
ECON 255. Survey of Economic Principles.
ECON 322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
GEOG 103. Physical Geography.
GEOG 104. World Regional Geography.
GOVT 101. American National Government.
GOVT 250. Contemporary Political Ideologies.
GOVT 252. State and Local Government.
GOVT 351. American Political Thought.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
GOVT 391. International Relations and Politics.
GOVT 399. Civil Liberties.
SOCI 151. Introductory Sociology
SOCI 155. Honors Introductory Sociology
SOCI 201. Social Problems
SOCI 204. Cultural Diversity in American Society
SOCI 205. Social Research I
SOCI 300. Social Service Institutions
SOCI 302: Sociology of Aging
SOCI 303. Religion — A Social Force
SOCI 304. Community Development
SOCI 306. Case Management
SOCI 324. Social Stratification
SOCI 325. Medical Sociology
SOCI 333. Sociology of Social Work
SOCI 360. Population Demographics and Dynamics
SOCI 380. Social Movements and Collective Behavior
SOCI 385. Criminology
SOCI 386. Sociology of Deviant Behavior
SOCI 387. Sociology of Drug Abuse
SOCI 390. Interpersonal Violence
SOCI 391. Families and Lifestyles
SOCI 395. Racial and Cultural Minorities
PSYC 101. General Psychology.
PSYC 206. Child Psychology.

COURSE NUMBER

Physical Science Electives

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ASTR 101. Astronomy of the Solar System.
ASTR 102. Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies.
CHEM 101. General Chemistry I.
CHEM 102. General Chemistry II.
CHEM 105. Introductory Chemistry I.
CHEM 106. Introductory Chemistry II.
CHEM 109. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry for Nursing.
CHEM 208. Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Health Sciences.
GEOL 101. Physical Geology.
GEOL 102. Historical Geology.
GEOL 300. Oceanography.
GEOL 370. Environmental Geology
PHSC 101. Introductory Physical Science I.
PHSC 102. Introductory Physical Science II.
PHSC 103. Introductory Physical Science III.
PHYS 101. Basic Physics.
PHYS 102. Basic Physics.
PHYS 151. Physics for Allied Health.
PHYS 201. General Physics.
PHYS 202. General Physics.

COURSE NUMBER

Fine Art Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 201. Beginning Drawing.
ART 211. Beginning Painting.
ART 221. Beginning Printmaking.
ART 231. Beginning Ceramics.
ART 240. Sculptural and Three-Dimensional Design.
ART 261. Beginning Photography.
ART 280. Art History: Ancient Art.
ART 281. Art History: Non-Western Art.
ART 282. Art History: Italian Renaissance Art.
ART 383. Art History: Modern Art.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
FNAR 105. Arts in Education.
FNAR 301. Fine Arts Survey I.
FNAR 302. Fine Arts Survey II.
FNAR 303. Topics in Fine Arts.
MUS 101. Basic Piano.
MUS 102. Basic Piano.
MUS 104. Basic Voice.
MUS 105. General Music Appreciation.
MUS 107. Honors Music Appreciation.
MUS 319. Jazz History.
MUS 320. History of Rock and Roll.
MUS 407. World Music.

COURSE NUMBER

Oral Communications Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 251. 
ENGL 304. 
EDUC 456, 457, 458, 461, 465, 483.
FCED 262, 239.
Collective completion of NURS 340, 371, and 422.
SPCH 101, 104, or 105.
SPCH 363.
Collective completion of MUS 211, 212, 272, 340, and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 223, 225, 227, 383, 385,
and MUS 272, 302 and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 383, 384, 478 and MUS 272, 303, and 341.

COURSE NUMBER

Approved
Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

36

Core Compentencies

Graduates will demonstrate the following knowledge, skills and abilities:

  1. Research federal and state regulations, consensus standards and industry best practices pertaining to the oil
    and gas business or operation using appropriate tools and references (e.g., world wide web; industry
    software; and API references) to obtain data.
  2. Define the common terminology used in all phases of the petroleum industry and the business segments
    that make-up the petroleum industry, including the physical and historical geologic origins of petroleum,
    exploration methods, legal mineral lease arrangements, drilling and completion, production, transportation,
    refining and marketing.
  3. Describe the various methods used in locating possible petroleum deposits through the use of maps, well
    logs and seismic techniques.
  4. Identify the six common types of Mobil Offshore Drilling Units (MODU), common tools, components and
    the advantages and limitations of each.
  5. Identify and explain the composition and physical properties of natural gas and oil and the different types
    of well producing and conditioning equipment used in processing hydrocarbons which include the glycol
    dehydration system, natural gas compression equipment, and various measurement and correction factors.
  6. Describe the components and processes required for safe production, storage and transportation of
    hydrocarbons taking into consideration the chemical and physical variables which include pressure,
    temperature, volume and flow of hydrocarbons.
  7. Perform technical calculations using a scientific calculator to determine computations in reservoir studies,
    oil production, gas production and drilling operations performed by petroleum industry personnel.
  8. Describe various well stimulation treatments (e.g., acidizing; water flooding; and fracturing) and
    interventions used to maintain and improve production rates in existing oil and gas wells.
  9. Demonstrate leadership abilities to effectively work and interact in a team environment involving company
    initiatives.
  10. Understand the organizational roles, responsibilities and professional ethics within the management,
    supervisory and technical levels of the petroleum industry.

ASSOCIATE of SAFETY TECHNOLGY (STAS)

Program Description

The Safety Technology Associate of Science is also both a stand-alone degree and the foundation for the two plus two (2+2) degree pathway. Like the Petroleum Services Associate degree, the courses that make up the 60 credit hours within the Safety Technology Associate Degree are embedded into the Safety Management (SMGT) degree. 

Students have the option to graduate with an associate degree and continue on to complete the bachelor’s degree.  Graduates of the STAS may become employed in the industry upon graduation with associate degree and continue on into the bachelor’s of science degree by way of the unique course scheduling offered in the PETSM program.  The unique rotational scheduling of allows students to work and earn a bachelor’s degree. The competencies for the Safety Associate of Science degree have been adopted from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals Safety Training Supervisor certification. 

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students should be able to do the following:

  • Research problems using basic principles of scientific concepts.
  • Communicate technical health, safety and environmental information to team members in a professional manner.
  • Understand the importance of training, continued education and professional development for career advancement.
  • Obtain gainful entry-level employment as a field safety technologist in industry and beyond.

Curriculum – 60hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 121

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: MATH 101.  Create charts, graphs, and tables using computational software with emphasis on algebra, geometry and trigonometry to solve applied problems in the petroleum industry.

COURSE NUMBER

PSET 171

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Introduction to well drilling equipment, processes and types of well drilling operations on land, offshore and deep-water developments.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Fundamentals of the regulatory rulemaking process, standards of machines, equipment, material, employees, power sources, as established by Occupational Safety and Health Act, Bureau of Safety Environmental Enforcement, United States Coast Guard, Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and Environmental Protection Agency. 

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 112

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Accident prevention with emphasis on risk identification, risk assessment, controls, auditing and program management.  Includes reporting, recordkeeping, investigation, worker compensation, cost factors and remedial factors.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 220

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Design, development, delivery and management of safety, health and environmental management training programs.  Emphasis on adult learning principles, learning objectives, lesson plans, skills in conducting group meetings, organizing and presenting technical information and human communications.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 230

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

History, scope, and effect of alcohol and drug laws and regulationrelated workforce problems. Scope and cost of these problems with signs, causal theories, and treatment as related to company programs. Roles of supervisors and management of workplace DOT and non-DOT Drug and Alcohol testing programs are explored.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 240

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Accident prevention as related to the maritime aspect of the petroleum industry. Emphasis on domestic and international jurisdictions governing safety and environmental management and marine operations.

COURSE NUMBER

SATC 295

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Permission of department head for graduating students in Safety Technology Associate of Science. Emphasis on preparation for professional licensure and certification.  Course includes formal competency assessment of program goals. 

TOTAL

24hrs

Course Number

Credit Hours

Course Title & Description

COURSE NUMBER

UNIV 101

CREDIT HOURS

1

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

First time entering freshmen and transfer students with less than 30 hours. Helps students adjust to the university, provides a support system and promotes understanding of the  requirements of the major. Career exploration/assessment pertinent to the major.  Satisfies university freshman seminar requirement.

COURSE NUMBER

Computer Literacy Elective

CREDIT HOURS

2

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CMPS 107. Computer Literacy Concepts and Word Processing.
CMPS 108. Computer Literacy Spreadsheets
CMPS 109. Computer Literacy Presentation Software
CMPS 130. Introduction to Computer Science I
CMPS 200. Computing Technology for Science Majors
CMPS 207. Computer Literacy Advanced Word Processing
CMPS 208. Computer Literacy Advanced Spreadsheets
CMPS 209. Computer Literacy Database Software
EDUC 251. Introduction to Technology Integration for Teachers
MNTC 110. Computers for Manufacturing Technology
MACO 322. Publication Design for Mass Communication
MACO 362. Broadcast Media Workshop
MUS 20. Computing Technology for Music Majors
OIS 200. Computers in the Office

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: Initial placement by ACT score of 18 or better in English, or C or better in ENGL 003, or satisfactory score on departmental placement test. Introduction to expository writing and critical thinking.

COURSE NUMBER

ENG 102

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 100 or 101 or satisfactory score on placement test. Further development of writing in various genres and critical thinking with an introduction to research. C or better in ENGL 102 is required for graduation.

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 101

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 003, C or better in MATH 115, or Grade of D in MATH 100, or Math ACT Subscore of 21 or better, or satisfactory score on placement test. Linear equations and inequalities, linear applications, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations and inequalities, absolute-value equations and inequalities, radical equations, functions and graphs, polynomial and exponential and logarithmic functions.  For MATH 101 WWW (web), priority is given to students enrolling in MATH 101 for the first time. Credit in MATH 100 is equivalent to MATH 101

COURSE NUMBER

MATH 214

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 100, 101, 115, 116, or 117. Organizing data, averages and variations, stem-and-leaf and box plots and other graphical presentations of data, conducting experiments, elementary probability theory, distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.  [LCCN: CMAT 1303] (27.0101)

COURSE NUMBER

Humanities Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 280. Art History Survey I.
ART 281. Art History Survey II.
ART 282. Art History Survey III.
ART 383. Art History Survey IV.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
ART 392. Readings in Art History.
ART 393. Honors Readings in Art History.
CULA 101. Culinary History and Development.
ENGL 211. Honors Studies in Literature and Culture.
ENGL 212. Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
ENGL 240. Introduction to Film.
ENGL 315. Survey of British Literature I.
ENGL 316. Survey of British Literature II.
ENGL 321. Survey of American Literature I.
ENGL 322. Survey of American Literature II.
ENGL 323. Survey of African-American Literature.
ENGL 326. Introduction to Folklore.
ENGL 332. Drama.
ENGL 361. Modern Poetry.
FREN 101. Elementary French I.
FREN 102. Elementary French II.
FREN 309. Children’s Literature.
FREN 310. Francophone Culture and Civilization.
FREN 315. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 316. Survey of French Literature.
FREN 324. Advanced French Language Skills Through Immersion.
FREN 330. Advanced French Conversation.
FREN 350. Introduction to Commercial French.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
HIST 101. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 102. History of Western Civilization.
HIST 105. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 106. Honors Western Civilization.
HIST 150. World History.
HIST 151. World History.
HIST 160. Honors World History I.
HIST 161. Honors World History II.HIST 201. History of Women.

COURSE NUMBER

Social Sciences Electives

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

CRJU 101. Introduction to Criminal Justice.
CRJU 201. Applied Criminology.
CRJU 202. Public and Community Relations.
CRJU 203. Criminal Related Law.
CRJU 204. Police Administration.
CRJU 220. Adjudication Process.
CRJU 305. Introduction to Corrections.
ECON 211. Principles of Microeconomics.
ECON 212. Principles of Macroeconomics.
ECON 255. Survey of Economic Principles.
ECON 322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
GEOG 103. Physical Geography.
GEOG 104. World Regional Geography.
GOVT 101. American National Government.
GOVT 250. Contemporary Political Ideologies.
GOVT 252. State and Local Government.
GOVT 351. American Political Thought.
GOVT 355. Political Theory.
GOVT 391. International Relations and Politics.
GOVT 399. Civil Liberties.
SOCI 151. Introductory Sociology
SOCI 155. Honors Introductory Sociology
SOCI 201. Social Problems
SOCI 204. Cultural Diversity in American Society
SOCI 205. Social Research I
SOCI 300. Social Service Institutions
SOCI 302: Sociology of Aging
SOCI 303. Religion — A Social Force
SOCI 304. Community Development
SOCI 306. Case Management
SOCI 324. Social Stratification
SOCI 325. Medical Sociology
SOCI 333. Sociology of Social Work
SOCI 360. Population Demographics and Dynamics
SOCI 380. Social Movements and Collective Behavior
SOCI 385. Criminology
SOCI 386. Sociology of Deviant Behavior
SOCI 387. Sociology of Drug Abuse
SOCI 390. Interpersonal Violence
SOCI 391. Families and Lifestyles
SOCI 395. Racial and Cultural Minorities
PSYC 101. General Psychology.
PSYC 206. Child Psychology.

COURSE NUMBER

Physical Science Electives

CREDIT HOURS

6

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ASTR 101. Astronomy of the Solar System.
ASTR 102. Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies.
CHEM 101. General Chemistry I.
CHEM 102. General Chemistry II.
CHEM 105. Introductory Chemistry I.
CHEM 106. Introductory Chemistry II.
CHEM 109. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry for Nursing.
CHEM 208. Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Health Sciences.
GEOL 101. Physical Geology.
GEOL 102. Historical Geology.
GEOL 300. Oceanography.
GEOL 370. Environmental Geology
PHSC 101. Introductory Physical Science I.
PHSC 102. Introductory Physical Science II.
PHSC 103. Introductory Physical Science III.
PHYS 101. Basic Physics.
PHYS 102. Basic Physics.
PHYS 151. Physics for Allied Health.
PHYS 201. General Physics.
PHYS 202. General Physics.

COURSE NUMBER

Fine Art Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 110. Art Appreciation.
ART 111. Honors Art Appreciation.
ART 162. Travel Abroad Photography.
ART 180. Major Art Monuments and Collections.
ART 201. Beginning Drawing.
ART 211. Beginning Painting.
ART 221. Beginning Printmaking.
ART 231. Beginning Ceramics.
ART 240. Sculptural and Three-Dimensional Design.
ART 261. Beginning Photography.
ART 280. Art History: Ancient Art.
ART 281. Art History: Non-Western Art.
ART 282. Art History: Italian Renaissance Art.
ART 383. Art History: Modern Art.
ART 384. History of Photography.
ART 386. History of American Art.
FNAR 105. Arts in Education.
FNAR 301. Fine Arts Survey I.
FNAR 302. Fine Arts Survey II.
FNAR 303. Topics in Fine Arts.
MUS 101. Basic Piano.
MUS 102. Basic Piano.
MUS 104. Basic Voice.
MUS 105. General Music Appreciation.
MUS 107. Honors Music Appreciation.
MUS 319. Jazz History.
MUS 320. History of Rock and Roll.
MUS 407. World Music.

COURSE NUMBER

Oral Communications Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

ART 251. 
ENGL 304. 
EDUC 456, 457, 458, 461, 465, 483.
FCED 262, 239.
Collective completion of NURS 340, 371, and 422.
SPCH 101, 104, or 105.
SPCH 363.
Collective completion of MUS 211, 212, 272, 340, and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 223, 225, 227, 383, 385,
and MUS 272, 302 and 341;
Collective completion of MUED 383, 384, 478 and MUS 272, 303, and 341.

COURSE NUMBER

Approved
Elective

CREDIT HOURS

3

COURSE TITLE & DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

36

Core Compentencies

Graduates will demonstrate the following knowledge, skills and abilities:

  1. Conduct risk assessments by performing Job Safety Analysis (JSA) and evaluating personal protective equipment
    (PPE), tools, equipment, and job expectations, in order to mitigate hazardous conditions and minimize the risk of incident or injury.
  2. Confirm that employees are competent and have the necessary job-specific technical skills, oriented to safety and
    health programs and are qualified by observing work practices or reviewing training records.
  3. Ensure that personnel in the work area are oriented to safety and health considerations by communicating hazardous conditions and monitoring behaviors in order to help ensure that applicable rules and emergency action plans are understood. Identify the six common types of Mobil Offshore Drilling Units (MODU), common tools, components and the advantages and limitations of each.
  4. Evaluate work practices by observing employees’ behavior and their use of PPE, tools, and equipment in order to
    minimize the risk of incident or injury and to comply with applicable standards.
  5. Facilitate a positive, proactive safety culture by anticipating hazards, modeling and coaching safe behavior,
    reporting incidents, encouraging employee participation and communicating performance measures in order to enhance safety and health.
  6. Take appropriate action when confronted with unsafe acts and conditions by exercising stop-work authority, modifying tasks, escalating issues to higher management, consulting with qualified professionals (when the matter is outside the scope of the supervisor’s capabilities, etc.) and disciplining employees in order to minimize the risk of incident or injury.
  7. Participate in investigations that determine causes, identify corrective actions, document lessons learned and address employee concerns using recognized investigation techniques in order to minimize the risk of workplace incidents.
  8. Examine the role of the safety and health technician within the organization and industry and realize the importance
    to continually improve professional knowledge, skills, competencies, and awareness of relevant new developments
    through training, education, networking and work experiences.
  9. Perform safety and health related recordkeeping in accordance with applicable standards using established
    procedures in order to document essential processes.
  10. Coordinate operations and work processes with other supervisors by communicating effectively in order to minimize risk.

NICHOLLS ONLINE 2-YEAR ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

NICHOLLS ONLINE VS TRADITION CLASSROOM

  • 100% online instruction
  • 8 week terms, 5 terms per calendar year
  • Can take a max of 9 hours per term
  • Some coursework that will go toward the other two degrees can be taken through Nicholls Online, but the degree cannot fully be earned strictly online.
  • Tuition and Fees – Click here
  • Schedule of Classes – Click here
  • Courses can be extended after the 8-week term for both personal and exceptional circumstances.  The extension can be as long as 6 months.  Personal circumstances have a $100 fee per month associated with the extension.
  • Students must contact nichollsonline@nicholls.edu to be enrolled in classes.

For more information, click here.

  • Courses are taught in class and online – In class courses (PSET and SATC courses only) are offered in the 7/7 format (which will work for 14/14 too).  A student basically has to attend class once a week. For 14/14, the student will watch the lectures missed online while he/she is offshore. Lectures are recorded and uploaded to the internet.
  • 16 week traditional semesters, 8 week summers
  • Can take a max of 18 hours per semester
  • Tuition and Fees – Click here
  • Degrees offered – Associates of Safety Technology, Associates of Petroleum Services, Bachelors of Petroleum Services and Bachelors of Safety Management
  • Extensions are not offered. A grade of I may be given for work which could not be completed because of circumstances beyond the student’s control and will not be given to a student doing unsatisfactory work.
  • Students enroll themselves through Banner.

*Students can NOT be enrolled in Nicholls Online courses and traditional Nicholls courses in the same semester.

2 DEGREES OFFERED

ONLINE DEGREE ASSOCIATE of PETROLEUM SERVICES
ONLINE DEGREE ASSOCIATE of SAFETY TECHNOLGY

For more information contact Nicholls Online at online@nicholls.edu.

MINORS

Disaster Management Minor (DISM)

Requirements: *SATC 325, SOCI 424, SOCI 425 plus 9 credit hours from the following courses.

SATC 240
BIOL 301
PSYC 313
SOCI 372 – if topic is approved
*SATC 385
SOCI 403
AHSC 425 – if topic is approved
GOVT 423

*Prerequisite SATC 101

Petroleum Exploration and Production Minor (PETP)

Requirements: Completion of PSET 121, PSET 171, PSET 231, PSET 241 and completion of 9 hours from the following courses:

PSET 310
PSET 331 or PSET 371
PSET 381
PSET 384

Safety Management Minor (SAMA)

Requirements: SATC 101 and 18 credit hours from the following courses:

SATC 112
SATC 240
PSET 301 or MNGT 367
SATC 325 or SATC 385
SATC 375 or SATC 380
SATC 450 or SATC 480